When you think back to the 1980s they are many things that come to mind. There is something that is highlighted in our minds when we think back on the 1980s, and that is the 80s fashion. It is very easy to recognize the fashion of the 1980s.

This cannot be necessarily said of the fashion from the previous decades, because they share common elements that make them hard to distinguish from each other. It is safe to say that the 1980s fashion is in a completely distinct class of its own. From pastels to tie dyed shirts, there is something that every person remembers from the 80s.


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Sonny and Cher


Bell-bottoms became fashionable for both men and women in Europe and North America in the mid 1960s. By 1967, the bell-bottom cut evolved from high-fashion to part of the hippie counter-culture movement, which also included love beads, granny glasses, and tie-dye shirts. The pants were even mentioned in popular music, such as "Bell Bottom Blues" by Blues-Rock group Derek and the Dominos.

In the 1970s, they moved into the mainstream style; Sonny and Cher helped popularize bell-bottoms in the USA by wearing them on their popular television show. However, they can be seen as early as 1964, in the concert film The T.A.M.I. Show, worn (white "flares" with a babydoll top) by a young Toni Basil, who at the time was a go-go dancer. Summary: Difference between Bell Bottoms, Flares, and Boot-cut. 60s Bell Bottoms (which came into fashion in 1964 and lasted until the end of the decade) flared out in the back and front from the bottom of the calf down with slightly curved hems.

They were usually worn by lads and girls wearing Cuban heeled shoes and Chelsea Boots. The bottoms usually flared to around 18 inches. By the end of the decade there was a new look called parallels, which had the same wide leg width from top to bottom. However, this fashion didn't take off. 70s Flares flared out massively from the knee down.

The bottoms could be up to 26 inches. Modern Boot-cut flare just slightly at the front. Bell-bottoms, both wide and just slightly flared, made from denim, bright cotton, and satin polyester, were so popular that they became a symbol of the outlandish and colorful style of the 1970s, and when that decade ended many hoped that bell-bottoms were gone for good.

Today, the original men's bell bottom pants and flares from the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s are collectible vintage clothing items. They are worn by men attending retro theme disco parties, in retro revival bands, and while out clubbing. They are a popular fashion item from the late 1960s, 1970s, and early 1980s.

Loon pants (shortened from "balloon pants") were one type of bell-bottomed trousers. They flared even more from the knee than typical bell-bottoms, and more of the entire leg was flared.They were seen worn occasionally by the go-go dancers on the British TV music variety show Ready Steady Go! in 1966. Made from a light cotton, De Stewart the owner of the well known London boutique "Youre Shop," had loons made in both bright and pastel colors from 1967 onwards.

These were sold both in his shop in Camden Passage and in various trendy markets around London. They were also exported around the world and soon became a mainstay of Hippie fashion. They became associated with disco music, but when the disco backlash started in 1979, bell bottoms started to fade out of fashion along with leisure suits and other clothes that had become associated with disco.

They were still popular in the early 1980s, but by the mid-eighties many considered bell bottoms out of style. In the spring of 2011, bell-bottoms as well as as well as the middle-section drop-like pleated pants, a variant of bell-bottoms, grew in popularity and in style among celebrities. Production in boot-cuts has slowed, even more so than in the 1970s.


Vivienne Westwood


Surveying the life and career of Vivienne Westwood is, as Westwood herself has described it, like trying to get a ship into a bottle, for her story is an extraordinary one. She was a central figure in the London Punk movement in the mid 1970s and has gone from being a subversive shop owner to a pillar of the British fashion establishment.

As an independent female in a highly competitive industry she has survived without compromising her ideals. Her vision has at times been at odds with the rest of the fashion world, yet her work has often been prescient. She has provoked outrage, amusement and ultimately respect. Her overriding gift to fashion is a conviction that clothing can change the way people think.

She once said: 'I think that the real link that connects all my clothes is this idea of the heroic'. As a self-taught designer, Westwood has brought an utterly original slant to fashion, and been responsible for many fashion ideas that are now taken for granted. Although her clothes are often revolutionary, she has embraced traditional British fabrics and materials, and made them her own.

While her work in the 1980s, post Punk, was wildly eclectic, the dominant theme of the 1990s was historicism. Westwood is ambitious for her craft. She has great faith in fashion as personal propaganda, as mental and physical stimulation, saying 'clothes can give you a better life'. Vivienne Westwood was born in Derbyshire in 1941. Her family moved to London when she was a teenager and in 1965 she met art student Malcolm McLaren.

Their working relationship lasted from 1970 until 1983, and memorably launched Punk. Fashion became for Westwood 'a baby I picked up and never put down'. Between 1971 and 1981 the couple ran a shop at 430 Kings Road in London which became the centre of the emerging Punk movement. The absorption of this outrageous and provocative cultural phenomenon by the mainstream and a growing disillusionment with working on the fringes led Westwood and McLaren to reassess their position.

McLaren became increasingly involved in music although he continued to contribute ideas for their collections. Westwood recalled: 'I didn't know what to do ... Malcolm said "look at history"'. She began to research in the National Art Library in the Victoria & Albert Museum, London and found patterns for 18th-century men's clothing.

These formed the basis for the billowing shirt and exaggerated trousers of the colourful, romantic 1981 Pirate collection, their first to be shown on the catwalk. The Pirate collection entered the bloodstream of mainstream fashion immediately. It also came to the attention of the Victoria & Albert Museum curators who acquired the Museum's first outfit from World's End (the many times re-named outlet at 430 Kings Road).


Let it Rock, in London’s Kings Road in 1971


Westwood’s first commercial ventures into clothes were with Malcolm McLaren, with whom she set up a clothes shop, Let it Rock, in London’s Kings Road in 1971. Recreating the mood and detail of early 1950s Teddy-boy and Rocker clothes, Westwood began to look to the past for inspiration for clothing that would reflect the present.

With later name changes to Too Fast To Live, Too Young To Die (1972), SEX (1974), Seditionaries (1976) and, finally, World’s End (1979), Westwood’s and McLaren’s shop became the epicentre for Punk, their slashed t-shirts, rubber clothes, anarchic imagery and bondage details giving visual form to the movement, while McLaren’s group, the Sex Pistols provided the anarchic soundtrack.

Later borrowings from the worlds of pornography, sado-masochism and fetishism layered more stylistic influences into the amalgam of their work. With the inevitable decline of the Punk movement’s power to shock and the absorption of its anti-Establishment imagery into mainstream fashion, Westwood began to direct her interest in the politics and theatricality of dress to the examination of the very idea of Englishness and the forces it has exerted on conventions of dress and sexual politics over the past two hundred years.

Ready access to the Victoria and Albert Museum’s National Art Library and its great collections of dress and costume allowed her to explore historical costume and, from it, to develop a completely new range of clothes that would form her first catwalk collection in 1981.

The Pirate collection drew inspiration from historical men’s clothing and became the look for the emergent New Romantics, while providing Westwood with a vastly expanded repertoire of styles of cutting and tailoring, construction, fabric design and manufacture, pattern, colour and texture.


London’s Kings Road in 1971


Big hair, big hoops and big on glitz, the Eighties were defined by over-the-top glamour but ruled by the “Big Six”. No catwalk show or fashion editorial was complete without the gracing faces of Cindy Crawford, Claudia Schiffer, Naomi Campbell, Christy Turlington, Linda Evangelista and Kate Moss. The ubiquitous six that make up an exclusive order of original “supermodel” babes epitomised conventional beauty and achieved first-name status in households across the globe.

But their reign over the fashion industry soon came to a halt and by the mid-1990s, the era of the supermodel was over. Now, 20 years since Moss was discovered in New York’s JFK Airport, the supermodels are set to return. When this month’s autumn/winter fashion issues hit the stands and the season’s new high-fashion campaigns are officially unveiled, readers might find themselves caught in a time warp.

American bombshell Stephanie Seymour plays dark and dangerous in Loewe’s new campaign shot by Steven Meisel, Eva Herzigova shows off Marc Jacob’s latest for Louis Vuitton, Evangelista is adorned in Prada’s swiss couture lace, Turlington is impeccably chic for Escada, and a brunette Schiffer reprises her 1992 role as the face of Chanel.

All this is a far cry from the Jennifer Lopezs and Lindsay Lohans of seasons past. So why the sudden change in sponsorship? It was the shifting fashions of the Nineties, as well as the “I won’t get out of bed for less than US$10,000 a day” diva demands, that led to the demise of the supermodels and opened the doors to the world of the celebrity cover. Fashion was moving away from the flash and brash to a quieter aesthetic. Designers opted for models that suited the new look and so as fashion changed.


Chris Waddle


There were some pretty unfathomable hairstyles in fashion during the Eighties, but this was the most inexplicable. Popularised by rock stars, footballer Chris Waddle and the DJ Pat Sharpe, it involved having your hair cut short on top, while growing it long at the back, so it usually hung down in lank looking strips like a nest of rat's tails.


1980s fashion in popular culture


Like the fashion of all modern decades, 1980s fashion in popular culture incorporated distinct trends from different eras. This helped form a cultivating movement of style. The most conservative, more masculine fashion look that was most indicative of the 1980s was the wide use of shoulder pads. While in the 1970s the silhouette of fashion tended to be characterized by close fitting clothes on top with wider, looser clothes on the bottom, this trend completely reversed itself in the early 1980s as both men and women began to wear looser shirts and tight, close-fitting pants.

Men wore power suits as a result of the greater tendency for people to display their wealth. Brand names became increasingly important in this decade, making Ralph Lauren and Calvin Klein household names. In the United States, Madonna was titled the "Material Girl" and many teenage girls looked to her for fashion statements.

The popular movie Flashdance (1983) made ripped sweatshirts well-known in the general public. The television shows Dallas and Dynasty also had a similar impact. The New Romantic was a New Wave and fashion movement that occurred primarily in British nightclubs. New romanticism emerged in the UK music scene in the early 80s as a direct backlash against the austerity of the punk movement.

Where punk railed against life in Britain's council estates, the New Romantics celebrated glamour and partied regularly at local nightclubs. The make-up was streaky and bold. The notoriously outlandish designer/club host Leigh Bowery, known for his exuberant designs, became a muse for artists such as Boy George and had grown a huge status in the early 1980s underground club scene.

The early designer of the romantic look was Vivienne Westwood who designed clothing specifically for bands, such as Adam & the Ants and later developed the "pirate look." The pirate look featured frilled "buccaneer" shirts often made of expensive fabrics.

One element of this trend that went mainstream and remained popular for most of the decade were short shirt collars worn unfolded against the neck with the top one or two buttons unfastened. Except in the most conservative communities this became standard casual wear for both men and women. With the exception of business suits, to wear one's collar folded appeared awkward or stuffy. Leggings were also very popular.



Headbands became fashionable in 1982. The trend started in California and spread across the nation. Other associated trends were leg warmers and miniskirts. Leg warmers, which had long been staple gear for professional dancers during rehearsals, became a teen trend in 1982. Miniskirts returned for the first time since the early 1970s. These styles became associated with the Valley Girl trend that was popular at the time, based on a popular song by Frank Zappa and Moon Unit Zappa.

The other fads soon spent themselves, but miniskirts remained in style and became an option for women's business suits throughout the 'eighties and early 1990s with dolly shoes. Frequently, these mini skirts were worn with leggings. Shoulder pads, popularized perhaps by Linda Evans from the soap opera Dynasty, remained popular throughout the 1980s and even the first three years of the 1990s.

The reason behind the sudden popularity of shoulderpads for women in the 1980s may be that women in the workplace were no longer unusual, and wanted to "power dress" to show that they were the equals of men at the office. Many women's outfits had velcro on the inside of the shoulder where various sized shoulderpads could be attached. The Dynasty television show, watched by over 250 million viewers around the world in the 1980s, influenced the fashion styles in mainstream America.

The show, targeted towards females, influenced women to wear jewelry often to show one's economic status. Synthetic fabrics went out of style in the 1980s. Wool, cotton, and silk returned to popularity for their perceived quality. Men's business attire saw a return of pinstripes for the first time since the 1970s. The new pinstripes were narrower and subtler than 1930s and 1940s suits but similar to the 1970s styles.

Three piece suits gradually went out of fashion in the early 'eighties and lapels on suits became very narrow (similar to 1950s styles). While vests in the 1970s had commonly been worn high with six or five buttons, those made in the early 1980s often had only four buttons and were made to be worn low.

Neckties also became narrower in the 1980s and skinny versions appeared in leather. Button down collars made a return, both for business and casual wear. Meanwhile women's fashion and business shoes returned to styles that had been popular in the 1950s and early 1960s with pointed toes and spiked heels.

Some stores stocked canvas or satin covered fashion shoes in white and dyed them to the customer's preferred colour. While the most popular shoes amongst young women were bright colored high heels, a trend started to emerge which saw 'Jellies' - colourful, transparent plastic flats - become popular.


Twiggy 1960


BBW is an acronym for “Big Beautiful Women.” In the past, a big beautiful body was associated with health and wealth. As a matter of fact, up until the 1960’s, BBW and plus size women were lauded for their beautiful physiques. The plus size woman appeared in almost all of the fashion photographs, films, and paintings of the 1920’s-1950’s. When did all of this change? In the 1960’s, plus size fashion rapidly disappeared from the covers of magazines and on the silver screen.

Many people attribute this changing trend to the first teenage supermodel --Twiggy. Ironically, Twiggy’s name suited her slender frame quite well. Instead of plus size blouses, plus size dresses, and skirts, Twiggy wore slinky dresses which hugged her small frame. In 1967, Marshall McLuhan boldly said: “Twiggy is an Xray, not a picture.” Unlike plus size BBW, who portray a picture of health and happiness, Twiggy looked ill at a mere 95 pounds.

Unfortunately, women all over the world quickly became unhappy with their bodies and fashion choices. Clothes that were made for small-framed girls were bright, fashionable, and affordable. The options for plus size BBW? Well, let’s just say they weren’t so glamorous in the 1960’s. BBW and plus size women were largely ignored in the 1970’s and 1980’s as well.

It wasn’t until the 1990’s that BBW and plus size women had enough. Curvy women and full-figured women were tired of trying to obtain an idea of perfection that was sold to them through every media median. Billboards, magazines, television shows, radio commercials and films portrayed Anna Nicole Smith, Claudia Schiffer, Cindy Crawford, and Kate Moss with their “perfect” bodies in the hottest designer fashions.



Then, as the millennium approached, the world watched in shock as something happened: tabloids and reality television began sharing the private lives of these models. Being thin wasn’t as glitzy, glamorous, and easy as it seemed. When the cameras weren’t rolling and the photographers weren’t around, many of these models struggled to stay thin. BBW and plus size women were finally able to let out a sign of relief.

In a fashion-conscious world that oppressed plus size women and BBW for so long, BBW were finally recognized as being healthier than the small-framed models. But, at what cost? How many BBW and plus size women developed eating disorders in their pursuits of thinner bodies? We may never know.


Kate Moss 199014 years old


At 14 years old, Moss was spotted while waiting for a flight at JFK airport in New York. The Croydon schoolgirl who disliked her studies and once admitted that she thought she "might've been a bank manager" would become one of the world's most famous faces and it's now almost impossible to imagine the British fashion industry without her.

At just 15, she was cast in John Galliano's show as Lolita, which would be her debut catwalk appearance. She followed this by becoming the face of Calvin Klein, appearing nude for Obsession and fronting an underwear campaign with "Marky" Mark Wahlberg. Soon after, she made her debut appearance in British Vogue and her first cover followed two months later.

Heroin Chic When Kate Moss appeared, supermodels such as Naomi Campbell, Cindy Crawford and Claudia Schiffer were known for their statuesque and curvaceous figures. However, Moss's skinny frame was completely different, leading her to be labelled as an ‘anti-supermodel' and launching a new look widely regarded as ‘heroin chic'.

This look was extremely controversial, as many people believed it encouraged drug use and eating disorders. However, this scandal only succeeded in boosting Moss's career. A Glittering Career Over her long career, Moss has graced most of the major catwalks for designers such as Dolce & Gabbana, Louis Vuitton, Dior, Versace, Chanel, Gucci, Robert Cavalli, Stella McCartney, Missoni and John Galliano. In recent years, she has chosen to grace the catwalk less and prefers to concentrate on lucrative advertising campaigns and magazine shoots.

She is the face of Rimmel cosmetics and has previously fronted Calvin Klein's campaigns, Burberry, Chanel's Coco Mademoiselle fragrance and many more. She has also appeared on over 300 magazine covers, including W, Vogue, The Face and Vanity Fair. Unlucky in Love Moss's colourful romantic life is as well documented as her modelling career.

She has dated Billy Zane, Leonardo DiCaprio, Evan Dando, Jake Chapman, Jesse Wood and most famously, Johnny Depp and Dazed and Confused editor, Jefferson Hack. Moss had a child, Lila Grace by Hack in 2002, before the couple split two years later.

Since then, Moss has entertained a controversial on-off relationship with Pete Doherty, a British musician whose life is plagued by drug problems. Cocaine Scandal Doherty was partly responsible for a scandal that rocked Moss's career in 2005. A British newspaper printed photographs of her, which appeared to show her snorting cocaine at a recording session for Doherty's band, Babyshambles.

The scandal led to a criminal investigation but charges were quickly dismissed due to a lack of evidence. However, it also led to a great deal of controversy, costing Kate a number of lucrative contracts with the likes of H&M and Chanel. Luckily, the controversy ultimately revived her career and she now earns more than she did before the scandal. She staged a spectacular comeback, snagging 18 major contracts and being crowned Model of the Year at the November 2006 British Fashion Awards.

Then, as the millennium approached, the world watched in shock as something happened: tabloids and reality television began sharing the private lives of these models. Being thin wasn’t as glitzy, glamorous, and easy as it seemed.

When the cameras weren’t rolling and the photographers weren’t around, many of these models struggled to stay thin. BBW and plus size women were finally able to let out a sign of relief. In a fashion-conscious world that oppressed plus size women and BBW for so long, BBW were finally recognized as being healthier than the small-framed models.

But, at what cost? How many BBW and plus size women developed eating disorders in their pursuits of thinner bodies? We may never know. In 2002, the world tuned in to watch the shocking reality sitcom the “Anna Nicole Show.” Although Anna Nicole’s life inarguably looked disastrous, no one could deny that she had gone from a slim Guess model in the 90’s to a plus size BBW over the course of a decade.

She eventually experienced success, not only from her reality sitcom, but as a plus size clothing designer. Unfortunately, Anna Nicole Smith died as a result of an overdose. Her untimely death, as well as her son’s, is still shrouded by mystery. Many people wonder if Anna Nicole Smith was the first famous BBW plus size model. It’s safe to say that this is disputable.

Emme (Melissa) Aronson is recognized as the first BBW plus size model by many high-standing members of the fashion world, and Angellika is the first plus-size model that was inducted into the modeling Hall of Fame. It’s all subjective, really.

Nevertheless, all of these women paved the way for plus size BBW all over the world. Women, finally, have been recognized and accepted in every shape and form. Beauty is no longer defined by single digit clothing sizes. BBW and plus size women are beautiful and deserve the opportunity to flaunt their assets and feel comfortable in their own skin.


Kate Moss 1990


Celebrities have a mesmerizing charm that attracts thousands of fans and followers all across the globe. Fans want to know each and every fact in the life of their icons. This is the reason why the pages covering celebrity news, television programs on spicy celebrity gossip and websites loaded with hot and sizzling celebrity photos are sought after most. How can we talk about celebrities and not mention Kate Moss in the talk? Katherine Ann Moss, more popular with a diminutive Kate Moss, is basically a famous English model.

Over 300 magazine covers have been prettified so far with her poses. Always in the limelight for one reason or the other, Kate Moss has hit the headlines for her uncommonly waifish figure and exceptionally short height for a model to carry. Being a model, elegance, style and beauty are something inherent in Kate. She is notorious for her wanton relationships and profligate behavior.

All in all Kate Moss is an interesting celebrity to know about. Born on January 16, 1974 in Addiscombe, Croydon in London, Moss was taught at Ridgeway Primary School as well as in Riddlesdown High School in Purley. Though not known for any academic achievements as such, Kate shone in sports. Sarah Doukas, who is the founder of Storm Model Management, discovered this beauty at JFK Airport when she was just 14. A black and white photo session with Corrine Day for the famous British magazine The Face was the beginning.

The photo shoot was titled "The Third Summer of Love". This was a prelude to a successful career as a supermodel. Moss has always secured her place in the lists of the world's sexiest women. Hers are one of the most hunted celebrity photos and no doubt she deserves a place in the list of most influential English celebrities. In the year 2009 she has stood 1348th in the list of the richest persons in the UK owning £40 millions in all. She has been ranked second in the list of World's 15 highly paid models in July2007.

Her entry into the fashion world in the 90s brought along a wave of severe criticism which includes strictures passed by the then President of the United States Mr. Bill Clinton about Kate's waif figure and frail features. Moss herself, however, didn't heed this criticism and termed her appearance on the ramp as a change from the buxom babes to a waif gal.

Very soon Kate's name was added to the list of world's most sought after celebrities. Kate's style fetched her a number of prestigious awards which include a fashion influence award given by council of fashion Designers of America. She is known for setting new trends and subverting the existing ones. These traits of her personality help her encash her talents and give her name and fame dreamt by celebrities.

Kate has a rich experience of working with the stalwarts in the fashion industry like Mario Testino, Steven Klein and Peter Lindbergh. Apart from her career as a model she has also been trying her hand in fashion designing since 2007 in collaboration with Topshop line.

In her other endeavors the most significant are her appearance in a music videos like "Kowalsky" by Primal Scheme, "Sex with Strangers" by Marianne Faithfull and "I Just don't know what to do with myself" by the white stripes. Her name is also taken in connection with her friendship with a number of rock and roll celebrities which include Mick Jones, Eton John, Anita Pallenberg and Siobhan Fahey.

Kate is one of those very few celebrities who are ready to be a subject of portraits for the contemporary artists. Lucian Freud and Chuck Close are a couple of such artists. Following the footsteps of many other celebrities, Kate also has indulged in a lot of charity work. She has worked as a supporter of Breakthrough Breast Cancer Charity.

Her contribution to the Eton John AIDS Foundation and some other social welfare organizations make important celebrity news. September 2005 gave a major setback to Kate's modeling career as Daily Mirror ran photos showing Moss snorting a white powder which was presumably cocaine. The news got the wind in no time and as a result Kate lost many of her major contracts. After a long investigation eventually she was cleared of all the allegations and once again Kate started her career anew.


Kate Moss 1980s


London night clubs started to change their format from Friday and Saturday nights as being the only important music nights. The club 'Gossips' in Soho began to do David Bowie nights on Tuesdays and then more one night specials for niche tastes. That set the scene for special one night club evenings throughout London. Narrow tastes could be catered for. Dresses in slinky satins and foulard silks or polyesters were often batwing or with set in sleeves.

Both styles had shoulder pads and frequently swathes of fabric were gathered and ruched onto hip bands, with falling silk, crepe de chine or chiffon asymmetric draped swirling skirts. Lace was popular for evening, especially cream lace bound with cream satin collars.

Lace collars made an appearance after being worn by the Princess of Wales. Mohair sweaters were over-sized, but covered with lavish beading and satin appliqué they could be worn for evening too. Highly styled intarsia knit jumpers became fashionable. Glamorous occasion wear was a reaction and an alternative to the dressing down that was emerging from the wearing of sport and fitness wear as casual wear, due to the fitness craze inspired by Flashdance and Olivia Newton-John's popular single "Let's Get Physical".



Dress shoes are categorized by smooth and supple leather uppers, leather soles, and narrow sleek figure. Casual shoes are characterized by sturdy leather uppers, non-leather outsoles, and wide profile. Some designs of dress shoes can be worn by either gender. The majority of dress shoes have an upper covering, commonly made of leather, enclosing most of the lower foot, but not covering the ankles.

This upper part of the shoe is often made without apertures or openings, but may also be made with openings or even itself consist of a series of straps, e.g. an open toe featured in women's shoes. Shoes with uppers made high to cover the ankles are also available; a shoe with the upper rising above the ankle is usually considered a boot but certain styles may be referred to as high-topped shoes or high-tops. Usually, a high-topped shoe is secured by laces or zippers, although some styles have elastic inserts to ease slipping the shoe on.


Rolling Stones 1980


The 1980s brought the “cult of self” and innovative jeans in specialised cuts were part of the way that we defined ourselves.” The fashion world became a place where you made your own statements and where trends became increasingly short lived. Lee Cooper expanded its activities by developing a complete range of fashion leisure clothes in more sizes, colours and fabrics than any other brand.

The decade began with the Lee Cooper sponsorship of the Rolling Stones concert in the UK and ended with comfort wear jeans that reflected the grunge lifestyle. The evolution of jeans and casual wear in the 1980s ranged from super skin tight "paint on" jeans in 1981 to “jogging jeans” with a drawstring in 1983, to jeans with holes in them (otherwise know as distressed” jeans) in 1988.

As the decade continued, wash finishes turned denim into a new fashion fabric as “bleach”, “river”, “rear” and “sand” joined “stonewash” in the range. In 1985, Lee Cooper launched a new, softer range of denim, emphasising its European origin. But the year after, music and fashion were Punk, inspiring Lee Cooper to offer unwashed jeans for the first time in 5 years. At decade’s end, girls’ jeans had returned to stretch denim and the fashion world was awash in Lee Cooper’s “acid washed” jeans.


1980s fashion for teenage girls


When you think back to the 1980s they are many things that come to mind. There is something that is highlighted in our minds when we think back on the 1980s, and that is the 80s fashion. It is very easy to recognize the fashion of the 1980s.

This cannot be necessarily said of the fashion from the previous decades, because they share common elements that make them hard to distinguish from each other. It is safe to say that the 1980s fashion is in a completely distinct class of its own. Even though one can still find boys that are wearing tube socks today, during the 1980s tube socks were the in thing to wear for girls and they wore it with almost any kind of outfit.

However, just plain old tube socks were not enough during the 1980s. They had to be a ruffled to make the girls look really in step with fashion. Movies played a huge part in influencing the 1980s fashion. Do you remember the movie Flashdance? That movie defined the new 1980s fashion look for young girls.

Suddenly everyone had to wear large sweaters that exposed one shoulder with the gym bra strap exposed over the shoulder. The girls also wore their hair in ponytails that sat on one side of the head. Stonewashed jeans were the very big fashion item in the nineteen eighties.

They had to be so skintight that you always wondered how people got into them in the first place. These jeans that were worn by men were accompanied by very colorful and decorative shirts or T-shirts. Leg warmers were also very popular during the nineteen eighties. Once again, very well-known celebrities influenced the fashion choices of teenage girls through a music video that they made. Girls were wearing leg warmers with shorts, skirts, and many other types of pants.

As far as jewellery goes, one of the very popular items was the bracelet. And of course these could not be just any bracelets; they had to be flashy bangle bracelets. The more of these flashy bangles a girl could fit on her arm, the more hip she was. The 1980s were truly a very colorful time.

Remember the popular male fashion accessory, those very brightly coloured shoelaces? Do you think anybody would dare wear them today without looking like a complete fool? Hats decorated with flowers or other types of prints were also very popular during that time. That is one of the 1980s fashion trends that continued into the 90s.


Coco Chanel 1980


Coco Chanel once said, "Fashion is not something that exists in dresses only. Fashion is in the sky, in the street; fashion has to do with ideas, the way we live, what is happening." Fashion is confidence and an art. Although the outfit may be laid back and messy, everything has been strategically placed; that's the art of it. Throughout the decades, there is always at least one fashion icon that sets the standards. In the 1960s, the top fashionistas were Audrey Hepburn, Jackie O. and Edie Sedgewick.

In the 1980s, icons Madonna and Cyndi Lauper were huge. Today, the forefront of fashion is dictated by worldwide superstars like Lady Gaga and her outrageous get-ups. Fashion, like history, music and art, tends to run in cycles. What was "in" when our parents were young has swung back to the limelight. Right now the 1960s and 1980s are huge. Everything about these generations rocked: the music, the hair and especially the fashion.

Not only are the threads of the Terminator's day back; they are ready for their close up. From the 1960s we have copied the fur vests (faux of course), the adorable fedora hat, and the high-waisted pant. From the 1980s, bold neon prints and colors are all the rage, along with oversized jewelry, perfected layered clothes, knee high boots and leggings.

The challenging part about all these looks is that they require certain masteries. The previous generations were more about music and fashion because they had no Internet, and much less to distract from everyday life. Thanks to Google and iTunes, we are able to relive these generations and not just read about them.

Take some tips from Madonna and her "Desperately Seeking Susan" era. Madonna is the epitome of the 1980s, and lucky for us, she and her daughter Lourdes (Lola) Leon have created their own clothing line called Material Girl. These outfits seem to have literally come out of her virginal closet.


Coco Chanel smoking 1980s


The term 'yuppie' first came to prominence during last year's US presidential campaign. At the time it seemed, from this side of the Atlantic, a mere sociological category, a particular demographic group • young urban (or upwardly mobile) professionals.

They were said to be important because observers wondered which way they would go. Well, now we know - they went for Reagan (only the blacks and Jews didn't). Indeed, they are the face - but not the heart and soul - of Reagan's America. Curiously enough it is hard to find people who think of themselves as yuppies.

Yuppies are always other people. The label is a construction, produced somewhere between journalism and psephology. Yet yuppiedom is there, a potent image, a potent visible lifestyle that is widely taken to characterise US society today.

Yuppie culture is what life looks like in the big US city centres - in gentrified older quarters, in warehouses turned into markets (a la Covent Garden, Britain's most yuppie invention), in restaurants, clubs and shops. Only black culture - hip-hop, ghetto blasters, street rapping, the larger part of cinema audiences - is as visibly present, and in glaring contrast to yuppie culture's affluent materialism.


yuppie mobile phone


American society has been greatly influenced by fashion and style. We are in constant search looking for clothes and accessories which are “in style”, and the 20th century is probably the time when people saw major changes in fashion.

The 1900s was influenced by cars where girls had to wear a dustcoat to avoid their clothes from being dirtied by dust from the road. The 1920s was a time when jazz music flourished and the flapper style short fringed dresses glammed up with long pearls were in.

1930s was a time when the women just copied the fashion trend of movie stars. 1940s was a time of war so the fashion was towards a uniform like attire with padded shoulders, close tailored outfits and short skirts. The 1950s saw the comeback of full skirts which are cinched in the waist. This is the time when Marilyn Monroe was so famous. The 1960s saw fashion which was patterned from influential women such as Jacqueline Kennedy.

The 1970s was the disco period, tie dye shirts and bell bottom pants. The 1980s was changed by Madonna and everyone copied her off the shoulder sweat-shirt, leggings and skirt. 1990s was sleek and sophisticated with acid jeans. Fashion is forever changing, but what would not change is the big influence and major statements that each decade makes with their fashion trends.


1980s Fashion


Even though one can still find boys that are wearing tube socks today, during the 1980s tube socks were the in thing to wear for girls and they wore it with almost any kind of outfit. However, just plain old tube socks were not enough during the 1980s. They had to be a ruffled to make the girls look really in step with fashion. Movies played a huge part in influencing the 1980s fashion.

Do you remember the movie Flashdance? That movie defined the new 1980s fashion look for young girls. Suddenly everyone had to wear large sweaters that exposed one shoulder with the gym bra strap exposed over the shoulder. The girls also wore their hair in ponytails that sat on one side of the head.


Stonewashed jeans


Stonewashed jeans were the very big fashion item in the nineteen eighties. They had to be so skin tight that you always wondered how people got into them in the first place. These jeans that were worn by men were accompanied by very colorful and decorative shirts or T-shirts. Leg warmers were also very popular during the nineteen eighties.

Once again, very well-known celebrities influenced the fashion choices of teenage girls through a music video that they made. Girls were wearing leg warmers with shorts, skirts, and many other types of pants. As far as jewelry goes, one of the very popular items was the bracelet. And of course these could not be just any bracelets; they had to be flashy bangle bracelets.

The more of these flashy bangles a girl could fit on her arm, the more hip she was. The 1980s were truly a very colourful time. Remember the popular male fashion accessory, those very brightly coloured shoelaces? Do you think anybody would dare wear them today without looking like a complete fool? Hats decorated with flowers or other types of prints were also very popular during that time. That is one of the 1980s fashion trends that continued into the 90s. Probably the one distinctive concept that would define 1980s fashion would be uniqueness.


Hip hop fashion


Hip-hop fashion is a distinctive style of dress originating with the African-American and Latino youth in The Bronx (New York City), and later influenced by the hip-hop scenes of Los Angeles, Chicago, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, East Bay (San Francisco Bay Area), and The Dirty South among others. Each city contributed various elements to its overall style seen worldwide today.

Hip hop fashion complements the expressions and attitudes of hip hop culture in general. Hip hop fashion has changed significantly during its history, and today it is a prominent part of popular fashion as a whole across the world and for all ethnicities.

Like the fashion of all modern decades, 1980s fashion in popular culture incorporated distinct trends from different eras. This helped form a cultivating movement of style. The most conservative, more masculine fashion look that was most indicative of the 1980s was the wide use of shoulder pads.

While in the 1970s the silhouette of fashion tended to be characterized by close fitting clothes on top with wider, looser clothes on the bottom, this trend completely reversed itself in the early 1980s as both men and women began to wear looser shirts and tight, close-fitting pants. Men wore power suits as a result of the greater tendency for people to display their wealth.

Brand names became increasingly important in this decade, making Ralph Lauren and Calvin Klein household names. In the United States, Madonna was titled the "Material Girl" and many teenage girls looked to her for fashion statements. The popular movie Flashdance (1983) made ripped sweatshirts well-known in the general public. The television shows Dallas and Dynasty also had a similar impact.



New Romantic was a New Wave and fashion movement that occurred primarily in British nightclubs. New romanticism emerged in the UK music scene in the early '80s as a direct backlash against the austerity of the punk movement. Where punk railed against life in Britain's council estates, the New Romantics celebrated glamour and partied regularly at local nightclubs.

The make-up was streaky and bold. The notoriously outlandish designer/club host Leigh Bowery, known for his exuberant designs, became a muse for artists such as Boy George and had grown a huge status in the early 1980s underground club scene.

The early designer of the romantic look was Vivienne Westwood who designed clothing specifically for bands, such as Adam & the Ants and later developed the "pirate look." The pirate look featured full-sleeved, frilled "buccaneer" shirts often made of expensive fabrics.

Hussar-style jackets with gold-braiding were worn with the shirts as well as high-waisted, baggy trousers which tapered at the ankle. One element of this trend that went mainstream and remained popular for most of the decade were short shirt collars worn unfolded against the neck with the top one or two buttons unfastened.

Except in the most conservative communities this became standard casual wear for both men and women. With the exception of business suits, to wear one's collar folded appeared awkward or stuffy. Leggings were also very popular.

Former punk posers had taken to glamour and romance in clothing and the club venues offered them a chance to show off that glamour at dedicated evenings. Theatrical ensembles were worn to selected clubs in London such as Blitz and St. Moritz. These were the recognized venues where the new romantic movement started.


Pinstripes three piece 1980


Men's business attire saw a return of pinstripes for the first time since the 1970s. The new pinstripes were narrower and subtler than 1930s and 1940s suits but similar to the 1970s styles. Three piece suits gradually went out of fashion in the early '80s and lapels on suits became very narrow (similar to 1950s styles).

While vests in the 1970s had commonly been worn high with six or five buttons, those made in the early 1980s often had only four buttons and were made to be worn low. Neckties also became narrower in the 1980s and skinny versions appeared in leather.

Button down collars made a return, both for business and casual wear. Meanwhile women's fashion and business shoes returned to styles that had been popular in the 1950s and early 1960s with pointed toes and spiked heels.

Some stores stocked canvas or satin covered fashion shoes in white and dyed them to the customer's preferred color. While the most popular shoes amongst young women were bright colored high heels, a trend started to emerge which saw 'Jellies'—colorful, transparent plastic flats—become popular. The top fashion models of the 1980s were Carol Alt, Christie Brinkley, Elle McPherson, and Paulina Porizkova.


Boy George 1980
The shoulder pad fashion 1980


During the early 1980s there was a resurgence of interest in the ladies' evening wear styles of the early 1940s: peplums, batwing sleeves and other design elements of the times were re-interpreted for a new market. The shoulder pad helped defined the silhouette and were reintroduced in cut foam versions - especially in well cut suits reminiscent of the WWII era.

Before too long, these masculinized shapes were adopted by women seeking success in the corporate world and became an icon of women's attempts to smash the glass ceiling, a mission that was added by their notable appearance in TV series Dynasty.

As the decade wore on, shoulder pads became the defining fashion statement of the era, known as power dressing and bestowing the perception of status and position onto those who wore them. They became both larger and more populous -- every garment from the brassiere upwards would come with its own set of shoulder pads.

To prevent excessive shoulder padding, velcro was sewn onto the pads so that the wearer could choose how many sets to wear. By the end of the era, some shoulder pads were the size of dinner plates -- it was inevitable that as the cycle of fashion turned, they would lose favour in the early 1990s.


1980s Scarlett Johansson


As Hollywood took over, the red carpet became more influential than the catwalk. Tabloid magazines and online gossip sites would dedicate sections especially to celebrity fashion giving designers more coverage than ever, prompting magazine editors and fashion houses to bump models from their seasonal campaigns and covers in favour of “It-girls”.

But how many more times can we hear about so-and-so’s drug abuse and however will it affect her million-dollar fashion campaign? Or even perhaps so-and-so’s political diatribe that may or may not affect her million-dollar beauty deal.

Actresses, apparently, can be a bit of a liability, although this is not the sole reason for reverting to familiar faces. Despite the reported growth in earnings for luxury goods houses this past quarter, fashion brands are smartening up and re-assessing their target consumers. Scarlett Johansson may appeal to women in their twenties, but the likes of Schiffer and Seymour will grab the attention of the generations above, and with it, attract much-needed purchasing power.

After all, women in their fifties and late forties may share an affinity with them, as they were busy forging careers and starting families when the supermodels were not yet so super. Ivan Bart, senior vice-president of IMG Models in New York, says: “In a downturn economy, companies want to engage a spokesperson that drives the business.

Despite their age, the supermodels have taken care of themselves. There is more information available on health and beauty today so women have more opportunities to look good. These models inspire that. They will guarantee these luxury brands sales.” There is also something to be said about being an original; it gives you premium rights to an untouchable status.

And though the Supers have flitted in and out of vogue during the past two decades, they remain as strong and iconic as ever. On working with Schiffer, Karl Lagerfeld said: “She’s better now than when she was 20, she is a miracle of nature. Those girls are miracles of nature.”


1980s  t-shirt


By World War Two, the t-shirt had become standard issue in both the US army and the Navy; and although the t-shirt was still formally issued as underwear, soldiers stationed in hot climates would often wear it without any clothes on top - hence giving birth to the modern notion of the t-shirt.

As the public were exposed to photographs of men wearing their t-shirts, the fashion soon spread into American life. In the post-World War Two era, t-shirts were popularised by global movie stars such as John Wayne, Marlon Brando and James Dean - and since this time, t-shirt fashion trends have undergone constant revolutions.

In the 1960s, Ringer T-Shirts were popular, as were tie-dying and screen-printing on basic t-shirts. In the 1970s, the black concert t-shirt became a staple with rock music fans across the world, as people began wearing t-shirts emblazoned with their favourite band's logo or symbol for all to see. While the t-shirt trend continued well into the 1980s and 1990s, these decades also saw the advent of slogan t-shirts. T-shirt slogans like "I'm with stupid" or "Frankie says Relax" - a popular homage to the 1980s band, Frankie Goes to Hollywood - became a common fashion feature.

But as these slogans became increasingly ubiquitous, it's no surprise that the early years of the new millennium saw the phenomenon of "personal branding" on t-shirts become a mainstay of t-shirt fashion. And with both traditional fashion retailers and t-shirt websites making it easier for people to create their own t-shirt trends, the world of t-shirt design has never been brighter - in both a physical and metaphorical sense!

With bright colours and bold patterns - a prominent feature of t-shirt fashion in early 2007 - t-shirt fans around the world can expect great things from the t-shirt world, both now and in years to come.


Hippies bus 1970s


As work clothing during World War II. At this time men's zippers were placed at the front of the garment, while women's ran along the right side. Later on, in the 1930s they became popular among the cowboy population. Jeans were a popular souvenir for anyone visiting the West's dude ranches.

Hippies continued the denim trend in the 1960s. Jeans were very hard to find in non-Western countries so they were a common postal item. During the 1970s the garment became more widespread as they begun to be produced in southern sweatshops. With cheaper production came cheaper prices. By the 1980s jeans had become a fashion staple.

Designers started to experiment with different styles and fabric variations. Sales continued to rise and rise. The garment is to this day a popular casual clothing choice, and is worn by kids, women and men alike. Origins of the Name Even the story of how jeans got their name is an interesting one. At one point they were known as waist overalls! Jean was a material made in Europe. It was named after sailors in Genoa, Italy who reportedly wore clothes made out of the fabric. Now we more commonly refer to the material itself as denim. The history of this term can be traced back to France.

Serge was a kind of material originating in the town of Nimes. "Serge de Nimes" is the French way of saying serge from Nimes. De Nimes would explain the coining of the term denim we use until this day. Back in the day jeans had a nasty way of disintegrating in the pocket area. In the late 19th century a tailor called Jacob Davis came up with the genius idea of using metal rivets to keep the pockets intact, and safeguard them from ripping.

Keen on applying for a patent, but lacking the funds for it, he turned to Levi Strauss with a proposition. Strauss accepted and so production of the new riveted trousers began. Celebrities and Jeans Jeans became a fashionable item and a symbol of youth rebellion in the 1950s after James Dean was seen wearing them in the movie Rebel Without a Cause.

This association led the garment to be banned in certain public buildings like schools, theatres and restaurants. At this time the fashion item was sometimes referred to as "jean pants". In the 1970s mens skinny jeans became popular among the punk community. Bands like The Sex Pistols became ambassadors of the trend.

The 1980s saw the introduction of acid washed jeans. Many people's idol of the time, Madonna was a keen advocate of the trend, and was snapped wearing jeans many times. The rise of hip hop in the 1990s came hand in hand with the growing popularity of wide leg or baggy jeans. Artists like Tupac were rarely seen sporting anything other than their beloved denim trousers. In this day and age jeans are worn by many celebrities from the Duchess of Cambridge to Kylie Minogue. They are an undying trend.


Dr. Martens shoes

Dr. Martens shoes were worn by both sexes in the 1980s. They were an essential fashion accessory for the skinhead and punk subcultures in Britain. Sometimes Dr. Martens were paired with mini skirts or full, Laura Ashley- style dresses.

They were an important feature of the post-punk 1980s Gothic look which featured long, back-combed hair, pale skin, dark eyeshadow, eye-liner, and lipstick, black nail varnish, spiked bracelets and dog-collars, black clothing, often made of gabardine, leather or velvet trimmed in lace or fishnet material. Corsets were often worn by girls. British bands which inspired the Gothic trend include The Cure, Siouxsie and The Banshees, and The Cult. This trend would re-surge in the 1990s and 2000s.


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