The 1970s continued the hippie look reminiscent of the past decade. Worn out jeans remained popular as well as the tie-dye. The fashion for unisex was on the upswing. Afro hairstyle and platform soles became in with the rise of the radical chic. It is said that male appearance got changed more in this decade than any other time in the century.

In the US, fashion was focused on simple and longer skirts. Jeans became more popular, becoming an accepted item in the fashion scene. Some of the designers who rose to popularity were Calvin Klein and another US designer, Ralph Lauren. Meanwhile, Pierre Cardin popularized a staple style of clothing featuring narrow shoulders with tight fitting lines, having no tie and interfacing, and coupled with jackets and tunics. Men also opted to dress down, regarded as hippie', and this gained recognition as more of a deliberate look.

One of the more innovative designers of the decade was Kenzo Takada, who mixed Western and Oriental influences to create a new fashion trend. Another name worthy to mention is Sonia Rykiel, who created figure hugging knits. An Italian designer who made waves in this decade was Giorgio Armani, who made a distinctively successful collection of clothes for women in 1975.

It was also during the '70s when fashion trends began to cross borders quickly. Western fashion trends were looked upon by the rest of the world. Synthetic materials were also introduced. The decade also got inspiration from fashion trends in the previous decades.


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It is fair to say that in fashion, trends come and go from one season to the next. However, it is when these trends begin to reflect entire eras that we have to wonder just how much influence previous generations have on our style today. With everything from the swinging 60s to the dubious 80s having made a fashion comeback, we are keen to embrace the trends that we may have missed first time round. Yet in fashion, there is a need to evolve and while inspiration may be drawn from the style of previous decades, it is rare that the look will be copied exactly.

So what does this mean for fashion today when we look to the ultra hip and fashion forward gents of London in the 1970s as our style guides? The 70s look started slow, with the 60s still having a strong influence in the early part of the decade with bell bottom flares and wide collared shirts still featuring strongly. While this look did last until the end of the decade thanks in part to the disco movement (think John Travolta in 'Saturday Night Fever') it didn't really take off in the same way as two of the other more prominent fashion movements of the 1970s - glam rock and punk - both of which were huge in the style conscious capital of the UK, London. Glam rock came into being in the early part of the 70s thanks to British groups and artists such as David Bowie, Marc Bolan of T-Rex and Sweet.

With their extravagant and, at times, androgynous dress code, there was a real sense that the very boundaries of male fashion were being tested and pushed to the limits by these pioneers. Silver lam© suits, velvet trousers, skyscraper platform shoes and out there accessories such as feather earrings and rhinestone studded collars were the norm (yes, this was the usual male attire!) and the bolder the better seemed to be the only rule. While this look may not translate that well into the Noughties, it was an important movement in terms of paving the way for males expressing themselves through fashion and led to what was perhaps the biggest trend in the UK in the 70s and 80s - punk.

The punk fashion movement in the UK is heralded as being created in the 70s by the now world famous British designer Vivienne Westwood and her then partner (and manager of the Sex Pistols), Malcolm McLaren. The very antithesis to the opulent glam rock look, punk was dirty, ragged and mean. From their studded leather jackets, ripped tees and super skinny jeans they epitomised the rebelliousness that was emerging in London's underground culture.

This look is still very much evident today, with Ramones t-shirts and sprayed on jeans being one of the more popular interpretations. In conclusion, it's fair to say that London, with it's hip music scene, has always been on the pulse of male fashion. By taking a little bit of influence from styles of the past and bringing them bang up to date, it is easy to see why people the world over are clamouring to make the iconic London look' their own.

Bruce Giles.


Canarby street 1960


Some people called mod as a subculture for the fashion obsessed, and the reason of the massive youth culture in the 60s. After the war in the 40s, the populations had embraced a huge increase of income since the war, and the youth at the time no longer need to work for the family, in addiction to that their family started to let them to spend their own disposable income.

As the young people using the disposable income to spend on themselves, they started to shop in the region of Canarby street,from the likes of Mary Quant, and in Kensington like biba. So many sub culture had emerged in that particular time, like the teddy boy style, the teddy boy style that evokes the bohemian look of berets and black turtle neck.

Newspaper focused on the fashionable youths who spend a fortune in Canarby street, music and art also flourished in a creative and imaginative way.The bands like the rolling stones, Beatles had made a contributions to the style mania, the fact that they wear fitted well made suits, with sleek black hair, all the youth has frantically copying these style rockers. Siren London is a store that started its first retail store in the historical Canarby street, their humble beginning of rock and roll style clothing for women, and vintage style dresses are all to evoke the old 60s mod style.

In the small town of Italy, there was a lot of frustrated youth who parade the towns in the scooters, and motorcycle jackets, the mod style had adopted that look into a subculture. It is now been used by high fashion all over, the devil may care mod look famously done by Marlon Brando in movies at the time.

Also been popularized by Elvis, its had certainly been a classic rebellious look for the whole world. Siren London had adopted that spirit in their clothing, with a lot of biker inspired prints, military jacket, parka coat, totally suited the modern mod look for the 21st century. Go sleek you hair into a bob, and put on our siren parka coat and skinny jeans to climb onto your scooter, embrace the inner mod fashion icon in you!


Hot pants 1970


The early 70's will always be considered as the 'back end' of the 1960's. The fashion and attitudes of the late sixties lasted into early part of the seventies. It was a time when technology revolted and began to change people’s lives. Lee Cooper mini skirts caused a stir across Europe as hemlines went from mini to maxi to mini again. The Lee Cooper product range of 1971 included hot pants for girls, suede jeans for men and safari suits. Then came the launch of the Lee Cooper “love” jean, the “cherry jean” and the first 32” bell-bottom flair.

As the decade progressed, Lee Cooper’s tank tops and hipsters were as popular across the universities of Europe as the celebrities that wore them. The internationally known couple, Serge Gainsbourg and Jane Birkin, were particularly noted to wear Lee Cooper jeans. In1975, an ultra-modern, environmentally conscious production facility in Tunisia was opened. In 1976, checks made an unexpected return to the Lee Cooper’s product range.

As the rock sound of the sixties gave way to the disco sound of the 70's, colourful corduroys and other fabrics came back into style. By the decade’s end, Punk and New wave music were hitting the clubs with a vengeance, and so were Lee Cooper’s “stonewashed” jeans.


Punk 1970


Punk as a style originated from London from the designer Vivienne Westwood and her partner Malcolm McLaren. Post modernist and iconoclastic in essence this movement was a direct reaction to the economic situation during the economic depression of the period. Punk had at its heart a manifesto of creation through disorder. Safety pins became nose and ear jewellery, rubber fetish wear was subverted to become daywear, and images of mass murders, rapists and criminals were elevated to iconographic status.

Punk fashion can be traced to the ripped jeans, torn t-shirts, scrappy haircuts and worn and torn leather jackets sported by members of the Sex Pistols. The Sex Pistols were dressed by Malcolm McLaren, their manager, who owned a clothes store called 'Let It Rock' in the Kings Road, Chelsea area of London, when they released Anarchy in the UK in 1976. These styles can be traced back further to New York artists at the Andy Warhol Factory or bands such as the Velvet Underground or New York Dolls.

By the 1980s, Punk fashion, and punk bands, had shown up in cities across the world. There was a DIY (do it yourself) quality to the fashion. Some small elements that spoke of a person's punk roots were safety pins, mohawk, spikes or harshly dyed hair, filthy tennis-shoes or pointy Beatle boots. There is an element of a makeshift, thrown together look and a sense of poverty.

The original punk fashions of the 1970s were intended to appear as confrontational, shocking and rebellious as possible. This style of punk dress was significantly different from what would later be considered the basic punk look. Many items that were commonly worn by punks in the 1970s became less common later on, and new elements were constantly added to the punk image.

A great deal of punk fashion from the 1970s was based on the designs of Vivienne Westwood and Malcolm McLaren, as well as the dress styles of punk role models such as the Ramones, Richard Hell and the Bromley Contingent.

Punk style was influenced by clothes sold in Malcolm McLaren's shop SEX. McLaren has credited this style to his first impressions of Richard Hell while McLaren was in New York City, supposedly managing the The New York Dolls (Note: In the documentary Punk: Attitude, David Johansen said McLaren was never their manager, and that he only designed clothes for them and booked them one concert; the Red Show.) The punk movement was a “statement of independence” among young people who were trying to assert personal freedoms over what they felt was an oppressive societal attitude.

By dressing and grooming themselves in such a manner as to shock and often intimidate those persons they felt were “mainstream” (and thus part of the problem) they made themselves visible and gained lasting notoriety. While there were many different variations on the punk theme, spiked hair was a commonly seen style because it was unmistakably intentional. It also generally photographed well.


Punk fashion


Punk was not just a whimsical stab at fashion creation; it was a revolution and encapsulated a complete era lifestyle, the music, the clothing, dance, language. and it brought together one of the most consistently influential groups of individuals, in the right place at the right time. Names we are all too familiar with like Vivienne Westwood, Malcolm Mclaren, Richard Branson, Sid Vicious and Johnny Rotten, the names behind the pistols. It was Richard Branson who signed the Pistols to a recording contract with the newly founded Virgin Record label and their first album Anarchy in The UK was a huge hit.

This culmination of different talents gave birth to styles still embracing our senses. Each individual went solo to become household names in their own right. From record stores to airways and railways, the Virgin name has been branded all over the world. Richard Branson and his flagship merchant services, Virgin, has become the inspiration of many generations of entrepreneurs over the decades.. He left school at the age of fifteen suffering from dyslexia.

Gifted with a highly creative imagination his weaknesses never deterred his resolve as he went from strength outright. Richard Branson was born on July 18, 1950. His entrepreneurial ways began early when he was publishing a student magazine at just 16 years. Branson did not go on to graduate school but in 1970 the now famous Virgin brand had its beginnings in the form of a discount records mail order venture that he and his friend Nik Powell worked on.



Soon after opening a record store on Oxford Street, London, Branson began a recording label in 1972, Virgin Records. This was to be the first major success for the British entrepreneur as he started the label with a hit record.

The instrumental artist Mike Oldfield's "Tubular Bells" released in 1973 was a cash cow for Branson's Virgin Records and it stayed in the UK music charts for 247 weeks. The record label went on to sign top music artists like "Genesis", "The Pistols", "The Rolling Stones" and "Simple Minds".


Malcolm McLaren 1970


In the mid 1970s as a young man not yet thirty, Malcolm McLaren owned and operated a London shop simply called "Sex" and dreamed of fame and fortune. He met a half formed group of teenage rock star hopefuls and fed them happy half truths about the great bands he had led to stardom. With his help in finding corner stone members John Lydon (Johnny Rotten) and Sid Vicious those boys became the English punk rock legends "The Pistols".

The group met its ends less then four years later and McLaren walked away with a little bit of personal fame, but with most of his big dreams unfulfilled. Using his status as a legend maker McLaren would later manage such 80s punk influenced pop successes as Adam Ant, "Bow Wow Wow", and Boy George, and even release albums of music under his own name. Vivienne Westwood accepted a DBE in the 2006 New Year's Honours List "for services to fashion", She has won the award for British Designer of the Year three times.

In December 2003, she and the Wedgwood pottery company launched a series of tea sets featuring her designs, testimony to her versatility and maturity and the respect she has garnered, a far cry from Punk. Endurance in such a volatile industry for a prolonged time is a hallmark by any measure. Together they forged a new creative direction for music, clothing and attitude, without a single academic qualification to share this is testimony to "born to succeed or fail".


Vivienne Westwood 1970


Meanwhile Vivienne Westwood carved out her own place in fashion history with her Pirates Collection and Buffalo Girl style. Vivienne Isabel Swire was born in Glossopdale, Derbyshire, on 8 April 1941. Her mother had been a weaver in the local cotton mills and her father came from a family of shoemakers. Her parents ran a sub post office in Tintwistle before moving to north-west London in the 1950's. In 1965 she met Malcolm McLaren together they went on to become one of the most creative partnerships in history and as they say the rest is history.

In all design disciplines there have been few that are true leaders; worth names are, Frank Lloyd Wright, the father of modern architecture applied his genius to The Falling Water House, perfect in proportion and modern in any era. And yet it was built more than 70 yaears ago. His work in the late 18th century paved the way to The Art Deco style, which began to take shape around 1920. He was decades ahead of his time, it's well documented. And, an engineer driven by steam and steel, Isambard Brunell the greatest structural engineer in living memory.

The Clifton suspension Bridge is testimony of his ability to create a structure that performed a vital function poetically. Not even the Golden Gate and Sydney Harbour hold a candle to it, especially in the wind. Their symbols live on in architectural structures, silk ties, bridges, business ventures, music and cufflinks, clothing and jewellery, all, instantly recognizably punk.


Bell Bottoms


Bell-bottoms became very fashionable in the late 1960s and much of the 1970s, both for men and women. They began as part of the hippie counter-culture movement in the 1960s, together with love beads, granny glasses, and tie-dye shirts; in the 1970s, they moved into the mainstream.

Sonny and Cher helped popularize bell-bottoms by wearing them on their popular television show. Loon pants (shortened from "balloon pants") were one type of bell-bottomed trousers. They flared more from the knee than typical bell-bottoms, in which more of the entire leg was flared.

They were a 1970's fashion, and could initially only be bought via catalogue from a company in Britain which advertised in the back of the New Musical Express. They were usually worn with a Led Zeppelin T-shirt and Jesus boots (sandals).

They became associated with disco music. When the disco backlash occurred, late in 1979, bell bottoms quickly went out of fashion along with leisure suits and other clothes that had become associated with disco. Levi Strauss & Co. (LS&CO) is a privately held clothing company known worldwide for its Levi's brand of denim jeans.

It was founded in 1853 when Levi Strauss came from Bavaria, Germany to San Francisco, California to open a west coast branch of his brothers' New York dry goods business. Although the company began producing denim overalls in the 1870s, modern jeans were not produced until the 1920s. The company briefly experimented (in the 1970s) with employee ownership and a public stock listing, but remains owned and controlled by descendants and relatives of Levi Strauss' four nephews.


levi rivit


Jacob Davis was a tailor who frequently purchased bolts of cloth from Levi Strauss & Co.'s wholesale house. After one of Davis' costumers kept purchasing cloth to reinforce torn pants, he had an idea to use copper rivets to reinforce the points of strain, such as on the pocket corners and at the base of the button fly. Davis did not have the required money to purchase a patent, so he wrote to Levi suggesting that they both go into business together. After Levi accepted Jacobs' offer, on May 20, 1873, the two men received patent #139,121 from the United States Patent and Trademark Office.

The patented rivet was later incorporated into the company's jean design and advertisements. Contrary to an advertising campaign suggesting that Levi Strauss sold his first jeans to gold miners during the California Gold Rush (which peaked in 1849), the manufacturing of denim overalls only began in the 1870s. Modern jeans began to appear in the 1920s.

In the 1950s and 1960s, Levi's jeans became popular among a wide range of youth subcultures, including greasers, mods, rockers, hippies and skinheads. Levi's popular shrink-to-fit 501s were sold in a unique sizing arrangement; the indicated size was related to the size of the jeans prior to shrinking, and the shrinkage was substantial. The company still produces these unshrunk, uniquely sized jeans, but they don't sell very well. The decade began with a continuation of the hippie look from the 1960s. Jeans remained frayed and the Tie dye was still popular.

The space age look was on the wane, though tunics and Indian fabrics continued to be popular. Jeans rises shrunk to 4 inches or even less as "hip huggers" with "bell-bottoms" became the height of denim fashion. Altering the appearance of jeans with bleach and tie-dye techniques, embroidery, and metal studs were popular as well. Polyester "doubleknit" fabric was coming into its own, with many clothing items for men and women being produced in this modern easy-care fabric.

By the mid-Seventies, as the economy improved, silhouettes narrowed, and hemlines dropped again from mini skirt to midi (mid-calf length) and maxi (ankle length), with all three lengths enjoying almost equal popularity.

Platform shoes with soles 2-4 inches thick became the style for both men and women. Men's ties broadened and became more colourful, as did dress shirt collars and suit jacket lapels. Fashion influences were peasant clothing, such as blouses with laces or off-the-shoulder necklines, inspired by those worn in the 17th century. Yves St Laurent introduced the peasant look in 1976 which became very influential.

Skirts were gathered into tiers and shoulder lines dropped. Clothing became very unstructured and fluid at this point. Embroidered clothing, either self-made, or imported from Mexico or India also enjoyed favour. The decade began with a continuation of the hippie look from the 1960s.

Jeans remained frayed and the Tie dye was still popular. The space age look was on the wane, though tunics and Indian fabrics continued to be popular. Jeans rises shrunk to 4 inches or even less as "hip huggers" with "bell-bottoms" became the height of denim fashion. Altering the appearance of jeans with bleach and tie-dye techniques, embroidery, and metal studs were popular as well.

Polyester "doubleknit" fabric was coming into its own, with many clothing items for men and women being produced in this modern easy-care fabric. By the mid-Seventies, as the economy improved, silhouettes narrowed, and hemlines dropped again from mini skirt to midi (mid-calf length) and maxi (ankle length), with all three lengths enjoying almost equal popularity.

Platform shoes with soles 2-4 inches thick became the style for both men and women. Men's ties broadened and became more colorful, as did dress shirt collars and suit jacket lapels. Fashion influences were peasant clothing, such as blouses with laces or off-the-shoulder necklines, inspired by those worn in the 17th century. Yves St Laurent introduced the peasant look in 1976 which became very influential. Skirts were gathered into tiers and shoulder lines dropped. Clothing became very unstructured and fluid at this point. Embroidered clothing, either self-made, or imported from Mexico or India also enjoyed favour.


fashion magazines 1970


Fashion and style. What are they? Do they always go together? Do they mean one and the same thing? It's hard to say. According to specialists in the field, fashion is actually a synonym for style or glamour. It has been agreed on the fact that fashion is a way of personal expression, and according to this criteria, one can be fashionable when he/she fits in this expression mode, or unfashionable, which would be the opposite.

Fashion has manifestations in all the fields of human activity, that is when can speak about fashion when we refer to topics such as architecture, clothing, music, cosmetics, entertainment, forms of speech or even politics or technology. Anything in these fields can be described as being fashionable or not. When one speaks about materialism or trend s using the term ‘fashion', it can be associated with a negative meaning. Most people today perceive fashion as a term referring mostly to clothes.

The beginnings of what we call fashion today did actually refer to clothes and they go back as far as the sixteenth century. However, it was only two centuries later that the real manifestations of fashion took place and it happened in Europe, among the wealthy upper classes. Fashion, just like any other manifestation of human activity, underwent major and continual changes, to the point where it is today, that is, being related to many fields of activities.

Of course, it would be unjustified to assume that fashion is the same all over the world. First of all, fashion differs from one society to another. Then, within a certain society, there are a lot of factors which may influence fashion such as age or generation, social class, profession or occupation. Even the geography of certain regions may bring about differences in fashion among the people of the same society.

But how does fashion change? Because we all know that constant change is what fashion is actually about. Everyone will agree that what is new now will soon become old, and the process goes both ways, that I what was once into fashion but is now considered to be old and obsolete will soon turn into something new again. Capitalism has brought along with its numerous good aspects some less appealing ones, such as waste.

People buy things which are not necessary to them and consequently speed up the process of change as far as fashion is concerned. Young generations have much to do with this change in fashion as well, because they are always eager and willing to try interesting things, things that they haven't experienced before, something new to be more precise.

What made fashion so popular among people was actually the television. The moment fashion hit television, in the late 1960s and early 1970s, was the moment when the general population became interested in this aspect. And fashion magazines, websites or even fashion blogs were only one step away. Pretty much in the same way as fashion, style can refer to may things, from painting, music, literature, web design to linguistics or manners of addressing people. The very definition of style describes the term as a fashionable manner of doing things, which points out that style and fashion are very closely related.

Not everything that is considered fashionable will also be regarded as stylish, which is why people should avoid turning into a fashion victim, one of those persons who will wear just about anything that's seen as fashionable, no matter if it suits them or not, from hairstyles and piercing to clothes.

It is true that today's world and the society we live in have set some rules in what fashion and style are concerned, but these don't always have to be strictly followed. Being a fashion victim will only turn you into one of the rest. If you want to be ahead at all times, what you must try is to define your own style and that will make you look your best.



A world famous UK clothing designer once said that fashion is a gentle progression of revisited ideas - and it's difficult to argue with this sentiment. Whilst fashion by its very definition is something that is constantly changing, there are only so many changes clothing trends can go through before they inevitably start to borrow ideas from previous styles; and this can be seen across many fashion crazes in recent years. The flare and bellbottom fashion of the late 1960s and 1970s was resurrected for a time in the late 80s to early 90s baggy music scene that emerged from Manchester; however, this time the style was a little more casual.

Furthermore, the mod style trend of the mid 1960s has certainly seen a resurgence in recent years, with skinny proving very popular once again. Of course, fashion has always been closely linked with celebrity life - the glitz and glamour of the music and film industry helping to turn the stars into role models and ultimately, global trend setters.

As such, it only requires a quick scan of the latest music magazines to see what's currently hot with young people across the country. Whilst some styles can change in a relatively short period of time, some things simply never seem to go out of fashion. Jeans, for example, is one item of clothing that seems to have been around forever.

Originating from the French phrase 'bleu de genes' (the blue of Genoa), denim jeans originated in two places independently of each other; in Nimes (France) and in India, where denim trousers were worn by sailors of Dhunga (which eventually lent its name to dungarees).

But whilst they were originally worn by workers for their hard-wearing material and general durability, jeans became fashionable in American popular culture in the 1950s, and became a symbol of rebellion across various youth subcultures of the time. And the rest, as the saying goes, is history. Jeans have been a fashion mainstay in many cultures since then, being worn casually by people of almost all demographics.

As is the case with all fashion trends, people have always sought ways to distinguish themselves from the mainstream. Over the years, popular denim fashions have included bellbottom, boot-cut, flare, straight-legged and hipsters, to name but a few. The hip-hop music scene also helped to bring baggy jeans into the mainstream, often worn alongside a baseball cap, trainers and a casual jersey.

This helps to demonstrate how one simple item of clothing can reveal quite a lot about the background and lifestyle a person chooses to follow. For now though, skinny jeans are back in a big way. If they ever go out of fashion again, perhaps it's best holding on to them, because you never know; they might be all the rage again a lot sooner than expected.


mods 1970's fashion


The 1960s introduced a complete new variety of youths to Britain and shook the World for years to come. These youths brought mass media coverage and called themselves ‘mods' coming from the word ‘modernists'. It was neither a fashion style nor a music genre but a lifestyle. This group of people were the first youths that did not have to go out to work since the World War began so spent their extra money on stylish clothes and general entertainment.

This rebellious stage was for the typical working-class youngster who would prefer to spend their money on clothes; vinyl's and alcohol fuelled events rather than food. Although these people were labelled as ‘good for nothing kids' there is no denying that the excitement of the culture and styling of the clothing is extremely appealing.

Mod revolution was begun by ‘teddy boys' who were influenced by the rock and roll which was being released in America and were generally well-known for their immense fashion taste. These stylish and wealthy young men and women dressed to impress with the men wearing slick suits inspired by an Edwardian style whilst the women sported a similar expensive fashion.

Working-class mods were inspired by such style but rebelled against the typical Edwardian suit-wearing teddy boys and created their own sense of fashion which is still seen as stylish today. With the up rise of mod subculture the music industry exploded with the likes of The Who, The Kinks, The Small Faces and more who fit into this specific music category. These types of people generally enjoyed socialising in music-filled all night clubs and coffee shops.

They preferred to travel on Lambretta scooters accessorised with lights. The typical male mod would be sporting either a full-tailored suit or a polo shirt, similar to the Fred Perry polo shirts manufactured today, and would almost always finish their outfit with a parka coat or a Harrington jacket. They had a specific style of haircut and always wore tailored shoes.

Female mods would wear flamboyant dresses, mini skirts and blouses with distinctive hairstyles and smart shoes. As this typical style became more commercial, models, most famously Twiggy became the epitome of this particular fashion era.

This caused a huge stir for the scene as it was no longer a distinctive lifestyle but becoming popular all across the country upsetting the scene and allowing it to eventually die out. Despite this fact, some people attempt to relive such an important fashion within history by purchasing similar items to the previous mod style. Films like Quadrophenia and the introduction of The Jam to the music scene in the late 1970s early 1980s were both stimulated by the past and such fashions began to rise again. Famously Paul Weller, the face of Fred Perry and frontman of The Jam, sported a look similar to the mod-style which is still achievable now.


Mary Quant


Mary Quant OBE FCSD (born 11 February 1934 in Kent, England) was an English fashion designer, one of the many designers who took credit for inventing the miniskirt and hot pants. Born to Welsh parents, Quant studied illustration at Goldsmiths College before taking a job with a couture milliner. She is also famed for her work on pop art in fashion.

Skirts had been getting shorter since about 1958 a development Quant considered to be practical and liberating, allowing women the ability to run for a bus. The miniskirt, for which she is arguably most famous, became one of the defining fashions of the 1960s.

The miniskirt was developed separately by André Courrèges, and there is disagreement as to who came up with the idea first. Mary Quant named the miniskirt after her favourite make of car, the Mini, she loved this car so much, she had her own one designed especially for her!. 


Carnaby Street


Carnaby Street is a pedestrianised shopping street in London, United Kingdom, located in the area of 'Carnaby' in the district of Soho, near Oxford Street, and just to the east of Regent Street. The area around Carnaby Street is known simply as 'Carnaby'. It consists of twelve pedestrianised streets with 168 fashion and lifesyle retailers, including a large number of independent fashion boutiqaues. The nearest London Underground station is Oxford Circus tube station (Bakerloo, Central and Victoria Lines).

The street derives its name from Karnaby House, located to its east, which was erected in 1683. It is not known why the house was so called. The street was probably laid out in 1685 or 1686 and first appears in the ratebooks in 1687. It was almost completely built up by 1690 with small houses. In the 1960s, Carnaby Street was made popular by followers of the Mod style. Many independent fashion boutiques, and designers such as Mary Quant and 'Lord John' were located in and around Carnaby Street as well as various underground music bars such as the 'Roaring Twenties'.

With bands such as The Beatles, Small Faces, and Rolling Stones appearing in the area to work, shop, and socialize, it became one of London's coolest destination associated with the Swinging Sixties. There are two Westminster City Council green plaques on Carnaby Street: the first can be found at 1 Carnaby Street and is dedicated to fashion entrepreneur John Stephen, who was responsible for beginning the Mod fashion revolution here. The second plaque, located at 52/55 Carnaby Street, is dedicated to the Mod pop group 'Small Faces' and their manager 'Don Arden'.  


Jean Shrimpton


Mary Quant ran a popular clothes shop in the Kings Road, Chelsea, London called Bazaar, from which she sold her own designs. In the late 1950s she began experimenting with shorter skirts, which resulted in the miniskirt in 1965 one of the defining fashions of the decade. Owing to Quant's position in the heart of fashionable "Swinging London", the miniskirt was able to spread beyond a simple street fashion into a major international trend.

Its acceptance was greatly boosted by Jean Shrimpton's wearing a short white shift dress, made by Colin Rolfe, on 30 October 1965 at Derby Day, first day of the annual Melbourne Cup Carnival in Australia, where it caused a sensation. According to Shrimpton, who claimed that the brevity of the skirt was due mainly to Rolfe's having insufficient material, the ensuing controversy was as much as anything to do with her having dispensed with a hat and gloves, seen as the essential accaessories in such conservative society.

The miniskirt was further popularised by André Courrèges, who developed it separately and incorporated it into his Mod look, for spring/summer 1965. His miniskirts were less body-hugging, and worn with the white "Courrèges boots" that became a trademark.

By introducing the miniskirt into the haute couture of the fashion industry, Courrèges gave it a greater degree of respectability than might otherwise have been expected of a street fashion. The miniskirt was followed up in the late 1960s by the even shorter microskirt, which has been referred to derogatorily as a belt or pelmet. Upper garments, such as rugby shirts, were sometimes adapted as mini-dresses.

Tights or panty-hose became highly fashionable, in place of stockings, specifically because the rise in hemlines meant that stocking tops would be visible. Mary Quant cited this development in defence of the miniskirt: "In European countries where they ban mini-skirts in the streets and say they're an invitation to rape, they don't understand about stocking tights underneath. Western cosmetics in the 1970s reflected the multiple roles ascribed to the modern woman.

For the first time since 1900, make-up was chosen situationally, rather than in response to monolithic trends. The era's two primary visions were the feminist-influenced daytime "natural look" and the sexualized evening aesthetic presented by European designers and fashion photographers.In the periphery, punk and glam were also influential. The struggling cosmetics industry attempted to make a comeback, using new marketing and manufacturing practices.


Jordache 1970


 During the early rise to prominence of designer jeans, in the late 1970s and throughout the 1980s, it was fairly typical to see fashions for men follow those for women, just as previously women had been the first to wear flared and bell-bottomed trousers. For example, Jordache initially marketed their products to women only, but soon followed with a line for men that was very similar in overall appearance to the women's. Given the general tendency toward bagginess in men's pants today, this male-after-female trend is less noticeable; nevertheless, most jeans companies have offered low-rise cuts for men in recent years.

With the popularization of disco and the increasing availability and diversity of man-made fabrics, a drastic change occurred in mainstream fashion, the likes of which had not been seen since the 1920s. All styles of clothing were affected by the disco style, especially those of men.

Men began to wear stylish three-piece suits (which became available in a bewildering variety of colors) which were characterized by wide lapels, wide legged or flared trousers and high rise vests. Neckties became wider and bolder and shirt collars became long and pointed in a style reminiscent of the "Barrymore" color that had been popular in the 1920s.

The zippered jumpsuit was popular with both men and women, and clothing inspired by modern dance (wrap-around skirts of nylon or polyester knit) also became common along with close-fitting ballet leotard-style tops with spandex.

Even women's blouses were available in body-suit form--close-fitting and fastening with snaps at the crotch so that the lines of the clothing would remain clean and close to the body, even while engaged in energetic disco dancing. Women's shoes began to echo the 1940s, with high-heeled lower-platform mules--"Candies" made of molded plastic with a single leather strap over the ball of the foot or "BareTraps" made of wood very popular. With the demise of disco, late in 1979, these styles (which were by then being criticized as flamboyant) quickly went out of fashion in 1980.

Designer jeans and painters pants then started to come into style. With the popularization of disco and the increasing availability and diversity of man-made fabrics, a drastic change occurred in mainstream fashion, the likes of which had not been seen since the 1920s. All styles of clothing were affected by the disco style, especially those of men.

Men began to wear stylish three-piece suits (which became available in a bewildering variety of colors) which were characterized by wide lapels, wide legged or flared trousers and high rise vests. Neckties became wider and bolder and shirt collars became long and pointed in a style reminiscent of the "Barrymore" collar that had been popular in the 1920s.

The zippered jumpsuit was popular with both men and women, and clothing inspired by modern dance (wrap-around skirts of nylon or polyester knit) also became common along with close-fitting ballet leotard-style tops with spandex. Even women's blouses were available in body-suit form--close-fitting and fastening with snaps at the crotch so that the lines of the clothing would remain clean and close to the body, even while engaged in energetic disco dancing.


Barbara Hulanicki Biba label


Fashions in the 1970's were far more relaxed than those in the 1960's before, many emerging design showed signs of nostalgia with designers taking influence from previous decades. Laura Ashley was noted as being heavily influenced by Edwardian style dresses and prints. Barbara Hulanicki's Biba label produced a 20's/30's influenced look with long cotton skirts, long sleeved shirts or smock and a floppy brimmed hat. The use of 30's inspired colourings, the two tone black and cream or brown and cream, could be seen in shoes and 'office work wear' styles.

By looking back the fashion designers were still continuing the new fashion trends for the new ideas, ideologies and social freedoms that were sought for both men and women. Distinct fashion styles for certain youth groups became apparent again through this decade in the attempt of identification of the differing subcultures. Several mainstream trends came and went such as the glam fashion (David Bowie inspired) and disco fashion.

(John Travolta in Saturday Night Fever 1977) The hippie/ethnic fashion trends of flared jeans, tie die shirts, peasant blouses, hair-bands and sandals continued from the sixties. More influence from other cultures became incorporated as social awareness of social and environmental issues increased. In the early seventies the short skirts and 'hot pants' launched by Mary Quant in the 60's were still very popular, dresses however were available for all in three established lengths, the mini (as the mini skirt), the midi (calf length) and the maxi (ankles).

Long flowing 'boho' skirts and the inspired hippie styles were very popular. Footwear started to become more exotic with the platform shoes that appeared in the early seventies, their huge soles of several inches thickness for mainly women and some men! Health warnings accompanied this fashion about potential damage to your back, although you do not hear many people saying they injured their back in the 70's wearing platform shoes! Men's clothing continued on the brighter flamboyant note from the previous decade. Flared denim jeans, once a symbol of manual work and now a fashion statement, along with a cheesecloth shirt is perhaps the most common image associated with men from the 70's.

However the glitter, heels, bright colours and disco-wear was available for all genders as the trends passed through. Lapels on all shirts and jackets grew in size and the kipper tie appeared to be necessary for the smarter male outfit. Longer hair and beards were considered very fashionable for men, the hippie and psychedelic influences were still in the fashion statements although the pop music had started to move on.

By the end of the seventies it was socially acceptable for most people to wear jeans and mostly flared jeans at that. Printed T-shirts became very popular in this decade along with trainers and canvas shoes. The inspiration and ideals behind the hippie styles from the late 60's were not as apparent in society but the fashions stayed.

Then Punk Fashion emerged onto the scene with the original Punk band, The Sex Pistols. The legendary Vivien Westwood was the partner of The Sex Pistols' promoter, Malcolm McLaren, and is credited with creating the original Punk look. This look was based around black leather, ripped denim and slogans on T-shirts intended to provoke and insult people who thought along what was considered mainstream ideals. The punk message was 'destroy'.

This destruction was of anything considered as mainstream good taste. Spiked hair dyed bright colours and second hand clothes ripped to shreds to demonstrate a rejection of the accepted fashions and ideals. The punk trend continued well into the 1980's.


The birth of the skinheads


The birth of the skinheads was influenced by typical mod culture and they interpreted the general mod style whilst sporting more working-class attire. Another inspiration was the Jamaicans and this new group of youths dominantly listened to the specific Jamaican music such as soul, ska and early reggae.

Although the initial skinhead culture was simply their lifestyle, music and fashion it has developed into a racial and political debate where white power and neo-Nazism has come about. Despite this, although all of these people may share the same music, fashion and lifestyle tastes this does not mean that they all share the same racial and political views.

Due to their close-cropped or shaven heads and working-class attire they differentiated from the mods which meant they gained their own label of ‘skinhead'. These initially began due to the post-war generation who generally had more disposable money than in the past two decades thus giving them the opportunity to splurge on more stylish clothing.

This craze began to fade by the early 1970s and other groups evolved from this but the whole skinhead subculture was revived and is still present to this day. There was a general style of clothing that this entire group of people seemed to participate in. In the past it was easy to identify who belonged to this specific group; this also remains today.

Both male and female skinheads dressed similarly and the women sported a similar shaven look sometimes shaving their entire head and leaving a fringe at the front. There are basic fundamentals which a skinhead's daily attire would include: Torso – a tailored checked or tartan shirt was extremely popular or alternatively a polo t-shirt manufactured by popular brands such as Fred Perry and Ben Sherman. As jackets a denim style, bomber jacket or a Harrington was widely fashionable.

Some of the denim jackets were personalised with bleach in order to create an ‘acid wash' look. Bottoms – typically, the most popular form of trousers were turn-up jeans which allowed them to show off polished, heavy boots or their socks when wearing loafers. Combat trousers were also becoming more apparent throughout the skinhead era and jeans were splatted with bleach to achieve a more camouflaged look. Their jeans were usually manufactured by popular denim brands such as Lee and Levi's. Footwear – the most prominent form of footwear were the Dr. Martens boots.

These were available in a variety of colours and usually patent leather and extremely heavy in order to achieve a working-class and ‘hard' look. They also occasionally wore brogues or loafers and paired them with socks which were shown off by their cut-off jeans. Accessories – braces where a must when it came to accessorising and these could come in a variety of colours which best suited their choice of clothing on the day.

Hats were also popular and many of these youths were seen with bowler hats and trilby hats. Sometimes, for a special occasion, skinheads would also wear a suit to go dancing at clubs to their favourite genre of music. There are many people who have adapted the skinhead look today and it is still seen as a stylish way of dressing therefore these items are available in a wide variety of shops.


skinheads


Bohemian clothing is associated with the California lifestyle of the 1960s and 1970s hippy movement. It takes its influences from the gypsy style and other world cultures, Indian, African, Asian, and Native American styles are some of the major influences of the bohemian dress. Sundresses, peasant blouses, tie-dye shirts, headbands, and the famous bellbottom pants were some of the styles worn during these times.

This style was very popular in the 60s and 70s and is still worn today although it's not as popular as back then Bohemian Fabrics Bohemian clothes tend to be made out of cotton fabrics. Bright colors are quite common along with plain white. Many styles featured patterns often with beads or fancy embroidery. The multi-colored tie-dye shirts were a common pattern worn. These clothes were loose and had layers. Other fabrics are made with wool and silk as well as linen blends.

Avoid synthetics, nylon or polyester and go for comfortable soft clothing. Buying These Vintage Inspired Clothes Bohemian clothing is still quite popular with some people today. Bright flowered Bohemian style shirts are worn by women in the hot summer months. These clothes add to the free spirit of a person with their bright colors. This clothing is far from the normal dress most people wear and that's what makes it fun. Look for ethnic style clothes with bright colors and patterns.

Colors that reflect nature are always nice with light blues, browns, egg shell white, yellow, orange, or whatever your favorite color may be. Colorful beads in your hair or a bright scarf can also make this clothing look attractive. Sundresses with psychedelic prints that are colorful are always a great option with this style or look for an artsy print. Don't go for too many colors all at once you'll want a medley of three or four colors on the design you choose. You don't want anything that's too loud so stay with a few colors. This California lifestyle inspired clothing also has plenty of embroidery which is another big part of the style. Look for clothing that have hand embroidery done which looks better than machine.

You may find some imperfections which gives it a very natural look to the fabric. Skirts Look for lose flowing skirts with plenty of nice colors. Paisley, tie-dye, floral and folk makes excellent selections. Ones with a border print will also look great. Choose a variety of lengths from just above your knee to down to the ankle. Pick a length that is right for your body shape.

Tiered and wrap around skirts with ankle lengths and sequins are a staple in a Bohemian wardrobe. Choose printed ankle length skirts which are fitted at your waist. Go for skirts that end at the knee if you're short. Ankle length skits will suit most tall women. Don't wear loose shirts with these skirts as you won't have the right shape. Loose Gaucho Pants Loose gaucho pants that reach yourmid-calf, are great for creating the bohemian style.

Pay attention to how these fit most of these pant styles are loose so pick a size that is correct for your shape. Pair these pants with well fitted bohemian tops. Choose Your Style with Vintage Inspired Clothing The Bohemian style gives you many options for your wardrobe it's up to you to make the style your own. There are no set rules as to what you should wear. This is a fashion that will bring out your own unique personality. Whether you choose a colorful sundress, a peasant blouse, or go for fun tie-dye you're all set to go back to the 1970s in style.


retro fashion


The nineteen seventies saw a general decline of hippie culture yet most of the clothing styles at that point were influenced by the hippie movement. This year included a variety of technological advances, disaster and the up rise of political rights for women and homosexuals. Popular celebrities such as Freddie Mercury and Andy Warhol ‘came out' which spurred controversy within society. Margaret Thatcher became the first woman British Prime Minster.

The first VCR was invented along with the Walkman which allowed the media and entertainment to advance further throughout the world. This decade was also unlucky when it came to terrorist attacks as a Palestinian group hijacked five planes in 1970 and the Munich massacre took place in 1972. Fashion has changed exceptionally across many decades.

The 1970s spurred a hippie appreciation for the previous decade. General fashion was also inspired greatly by Hollywood movie stars who sported the kind of ‘disco look'. Steering towards the end of the seventies a different fashion replaced the previous and this consisted of punk fashion which was completely unprecedented.

Men became much more experimental during the seventies than ever before due to the unleashing of creativity and independence throughout the sixties. During the early times of this era the most popular ensembles of attire included flares, patterns and ties. With the influence of major music artists such as David Bowie who regularly sported a ‘glittered' look, men felt more confident to tap into their feminine side.

With longer hair, moustaches and side-burns, this fantastic era saw a turn within fashion than it had not seen previously as it was completely innovative. Despite this peculiar turn the disco era did not last very long as the late-1970s brought the punk rock era. It has been said that the main influences of punk fashion were Vivienne Westwood and her partner Malcolm McLaren.

This curious turn was a rebellion to economic depression and everyone who wore this particular style was reacting against the world. Male rockers such as Sid Vicious (frontman of the Sex Pistols) played a huge part in working with Westwood to promote such an obscure fashion taste.

This style has been said to trace back to the time of the band, The Velvet Underground, who initially began this creative rebel style. When wearing punk-like attire men would usually have ripped jeans, torn t-shirts and controversial haircuts paired with an old leather jacket.

The fashion was described as a ‘sense of poverty' as they projected their political feelings through what they wore and felt as if the economy was completely failing. Their rebellious ways began a brand new movement which can be seen in modern fashion today as we still have the jeans and the leather jackets.


1970s fashion


There are many fashion fanatics around the world who have heard a lot about vintage fashion but hardly have any idea what it actually is. In this article we are going to discuss about various vintage styles and the best ways of wearing them. Those who love vintage outfits and curious to learn more about such dresses can gain a lot of insight from here.

First of all let's see what vintage or retro fashion really means. You might have gone through a lot of fashion magazines to get idea on creating a vintage look but without adequate knowledge about retro clothing your efforts would fall short of achieving your desired appearance. Vintage and retro are synonymous word referring to same fashion movement.

According to the opinion of most fashion designers and experts, the term vintage fashion relates to some of the distinct trends of yesteryears that have made a strong comeback in recent years. Different eras of the past had produced different vintage styles; for instances, the decade of 1920's was famous for the masculine style and the later part of the decade was all about ‘roaring' styles, 1950's teddy boy style, 1960's mini skirt and the disco and hippie costumes of 1970's.

All these vintage fashion trends have now got merged with the current fashion trends and are highly sought-after among the fashionable men and women. Any distinct fashion trend from 1920's to 70's constitutes vintage trends.

This is why even though the shell-suit of the 1980' is also a marked style but it doesn't qualify as vintage style as it came after 1970's. Many fashion-conscious people also get confused between vintage style and genuine vintage outfits. Vintage style dresses are manufactured in recent times and are inspired by vintage styles only. These clothes are made of modern fabric and available in plenty at a much cheaper price.

Authentic vintage dresses, on the other hand, are rare and costly as these apparels were made during those bygone eras when those styles, cuts and patterns first came to existence. But those who want to flaunt vintage fashion out in the public; this difference hardly makes any sense as whatever is the actual age of the cloth, the style that it carries matter only. Now that you have understood the proper meaning of vintage styles and wondering where you can grab

them from, let's take a look at the places where vintage attire of good condition are available in abundance. Although there are many thrift and charity shops, yard sales, flea markets, but the most convenient way of finding out choicest vintage apparels is to look for them online. These are scores of online fashion boutiques such as Voodoo Vixen that host a myriad of vintage fashion garments.

These vintage attires are arranged according to the epoch they belong to with detailed descriptions and multiple photographs. Voodoo Vixen has come up with discount offers in this Christmas so that vintage lovers can shop to their heart's content.

While on the hunt for a quality online vintage shop, buyers should put utmost stress on the specialist vintage garments retailer as they can answer better to any queries by buyers and can impart good advice on how to take care of these graceful clothes and also how to wear them in the best manner and what kind of jewelleries and accessories go well with them.


Fashions in the 1970's were far more relaxed than those in the 1960's before, many emerging design showed signs of nostalgia with designers taking influence from previous decades. Laura Ashley was noted as being heavily influenced by Edwardian style dresses and prints. Barbara Hulanicki's Biba label produced a 20's/30's influenced look with long cotton skirts, long sleeved shirts or smock and a floppy brimmed hat.

The use of 30's inspired colourings, the two tone black and cream or brown and cream, could be seen in shoes and 'office work wear' styles. By looking back the fashion designers were still continuing the new fashion trends for the new ideas, ideologies and social freedoms that were sought for both men and women. Distinct fashion styles for certain youth groups became apparent again through this decade in the attempt of identification of the differing subcultures.

Several mainstream trends came and went such as the glam fashion (David Bowie inspired) and disco fashion. (John Travolta in Saturday Night Fever 1977) The hippie/ethnic fashion trends of flared jeans, tie die shirts, peasant blouses, hair-bands and sandals continued from the sixties. More influence from other cultures became incorporated as social awareness of social and environmental issues increased. In the early seventies the short skirts and 'hot pants' launched by Mary Quant in the 60's were still very popular, dresses however were available for all in three established lengths, the mini (as the mini skirt), the midi (calf length) and the maxi (ankles).

Long flowing 'boho' skirts and the inspired hippie styles were very popular. Footwear started to become more exotic with the platform shoes that appeared in the early seventies, their huge soles of several inches thickness for mainly women and some men! Health warnings accompanied this fashion about potential damage to your back, although you do not hear many people saying they injured their back in the 70's wearing platform shoes! Men's clothing continued on the brighter flamboyant note from the previous decade. Flared denim jeans, once a symbol of manual work and now a fashion statement, along with a cheesecloth shirt is perhaps the most common image associated with men from the 70's.

However the glitter, heels, bright colours and disco-wear was available for all genders as the trends passed through. Lapels on all shirts and jackets grew in size and the kipper tie appeared to be necessary for the smarter male outfit. Longer hair and beards were considered very fashionable for men, the hippie and psychedelic influences were still in the fashion statements although the pop music had started to move on. By the end of the seventies it was socially acceptable for most people to wear jeans and mostly flared jeans at that. Printed T-shirts became very popular in this decade along with trainers and canvas shoes.

The inspiration and ideals behind the hippie styles from the late 60's were not as apparent in society but the fashions stayed. Then Punk Fashion emerged onto the scene with the original Punk band, The Sex Pistols. The legendary Vivien Westwood was the partner of The Sex Pistols' promoter, Malcolm McLaren, and is credited with creating the original Punk look. This look was based around black leather, ripped denim and slogans on T-shirts intended to provoke and insult people who thought along what was considered mainstream ideals.

The punk message was 'destroy'. This destruction was of anything considered as mainstream good taste. Spiked hair dyed bright colours and second hand clothes ripped to shreds to demonstrate a rejection of the accepted fashions and ideals. The punk trend continued well into the 1980's.

Amber Allen.

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