After World War I, America entered a prosperous era and, as a result of its role in the war, came out onto the world stage. Social customs and morals were relaxed in the optimism brought on by the end of the war and the booming of the stock market. Women were entering the workforce in record numbers. The nationwide prohibition on alcohol was ignored by many. There was a revolution in almost every sphere of human activity, and fashion was no exception.

Clothing changed with women's changing roles in modern society, particularly with the idea of new fashion. Although society matrons of a certain age continued to wear conservative dresses, forward-looking and younger women now made sportswear into the greatest change in post- war fashion. The tubular dresses of the 'teens had evolved into a similar silhouette that now sported shorter skirts with pleats, gathers, or slits to allow motion. Undergarments began to transform after World War I to conform to the ideals of a flatter chest and more boyish figure.

The corset was diminishing and the bandeau, flattening style was prevalent in the early 1920s. During the mid-twenties all-in-one lingerie became popular, leaving behind the corset and moving into the curvier brassiere era of the 1930s. The women's rights movement had a strong effect on women's sexual fashions. Most importantly, the confining corset was discarded, as undergarments changed to suit the new fashions in this decade. Instead of drawers and knickers, women now wore panties, which were more comfortable. The chemise or camisole was employed in place of the corset.

During the early part of the decade, chemises paired with bloomers kept a woman covered beneath her outer garments. For the first time in centuries, women's legs were seen with hemlines rising to the knee and dresses becoming more fitted. A more masculine look became popular, including flattened breasts and hips, short hairstyles such as the bob cut, Eton Crop and the Marcel Wave. One of the first women to wear trousers, cut her hair and reject the corset was Coco Chanel. Probably the most influential woman in fashion of the 20th century, Coco Chanel did much to further the emancipation and freedom of women's fashion.



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The 1930's brought a sleek, sexy look to fashion. So clever Hollywood draped slinky silk satin over the Stars of the day, covering their bosom but removing their brassieres. The majority of dresses were cut on the bias to give the dress a flowing look at the bottom. Fabrics such as silk, satin, organza, net, chiffon, brocade, velvet and lace were used to great effect. 


World War I Fashion


Flappers were a so-called new style of Western woman, and the term “flapper” was invented to describe this so-called new breed. Initiated in the 1920s, the term “flapper” described women who flamboyantly flouted their contempt for what was back then deemed as societal behavior that was conventional. Flappers were women who were characterized by their choice of bobbed hair, short skirts, and their enjoyment of jazz music. They were branded as brash for their enjoyment of casual sex, drinking, immoderate makeup, driving cars and smoking.

The origins of flappers, ideologically, were seen as being rooted in liberalism. There is debate over what the etymology of the word “flapper” really is. Some sources believe that it is merely a reference to a young bird that is just learning to fly for the first time and so flaps its wings. However, other sources feature more sinister and scandalous origins of the word “flapper.” For example, “flapper” may have been used to denote teenage girls in Northern England, or it may even have come from an older word that was used in reference to a prostitute. After World War I, the flapper generally represented a lewd and disreputable woman who consistently flouted the conventions of society at the time of the 1920s.

Still, despite the fact that a flapper’s conduct was at the time considered less than respectable, it still helped to redefine the role of women in society at large. The image of the flapper was that of a young woman who frequented jazz clubs at night to dance provocatively, smoke cigarettes, and date men indiscriminately. Other activities they indulged in were driving cars, riding bicycles, and defied Prohibition by openly drinking alcohol. These women also were fond of holding petting parties, where making out and forms of foreplay were popular and also the main event. The image of the flapper was something of a direct result of the popular disgust among Americans at the Prohibition laws.

Speakeasies got to be popular and widespread because of the widespread closure of cabarets and saloons. The ubiquitous drinking of alcohol despite the efforts of Prohibition fostered a sense of contempt for authority. As a result, the flapper lifestyle among young women began to pick up. For all the bad press and disrepute that their lifestyle attracted, flappers were at the same time, however, being seen symbolically as apparent advantages for the women’s movement and for feminism.

This was because in addition to all their notorious, social activities, they also began to have an impact on the workplace by increasingly working outside of the home, which had the effect of defying the traditional roles of women in U.S. society. Politically, they were also somewhat active in the sense that they were supporters of both women’s rights as well as voting. At the same time, flappers were being looked at as also defying Victorian gender roles that were traditional, commitment to being religious, and commitment to hard work and modesty.



Flappers and women in general began to increasingly cling to new concepts like personal choice and consumerism while ridding themselves of rigid and older ideas about the role of women. Flappers were frequently referred to in the context of a culture war of the anti-traditional versus the traditional. In this way, flappers were increasingly being regarded as a symbol of the larger, societal change that was underfoot, such as the first time women were permitted to vote in the U.S.

However, for all the talk and the recognition about how flappers were part of the women’s movement and were symbolic of women’s empowerment, they also had their critics among women who asserted flappers were not really involved in politics at all.

Suffragettes, particularly older women who had sincerely fought for the eventual right for women to vote, tended to actually look down on flappers and dismiss them as superficial. Some even went so far as to believe that flappers were not even worthy of the right to vote that older suffragettes had worked so hard to win. Still others believed that what flappers were “accomplishing” was not in fact a product of their own achievement.

Instead, they believed that the anything-goes attitude of flappers was just the natural follow-through from female liberation, which had already been secured in previous years. Despite the popularity of the flapper lifestyle during the 1920s, the new found and supposed female liberation did not last long because of the hard realities of the looming economic crisis just on the horizon. The Wall Street Crash and the ensuing Great Depression of the 1930s ensured that the hedonism and excesses of flappers were abruptly and instantly snuffed out.


 Elsa Schiaparelli

Elsa Schiaparell.


The straight-line chemise topped by the close-fitting cloche hat became the uniform of the day. Women "bobbed," or cut, their hair short to fit under the popular hats, a radical move in the beginning, but standard by the end of the decade. Low-waisted dresses with fullness at the hemline allowed women to kick up their heels literally in new dances like the Charleston. Jean Patou, a new designer on the French scene, began making two-piece sweater and skirt outfits in luxurious wool jersey and had an instant hit for his morning dresses and sports suits.

American women embraced the clothes of the designer as perfect for their increasingly active lifestyles. By the end of the Twenties,

Elsa Schiaparelli stepped onto the stage to represent a younger generation. She combined the idea of classic design from the Greeks and Romans (think "tunic") with the modern imperative for freedom of movement. Schiaparelli wrote that the ancient Greeks "gave to their goddesses ... the serenity of perfection and the fabulous appearance of freedom." Her own interpretation produced gowns of elegant simplicity. Departing from the chemise, her clothes returned to an awareness of the body beneath the gown. In the world of art, fashion was being influenced heavily on art movements such as surrealism.

After World War I, popular art saw a slow transition from the lush, curvilinear abstractions of art nouveau decoration to the more mechanized, smooth, and geometric forms of art deco. Elsa Schiaparelli is one key Italian designer of this decade who was heavily influenced by the "beyond the real" art and incorporated it into her designs.

During the Twenties, Tirocchi clients asked for designs by known designers rather than work with Madame Tirocchi directly to create gowns for them. Most of these dresses were copies produced by New York fashion houses like Harry Angelo and Maginnis & Thomas, although some came from the New York City department stores B. Altman and Lord and Taylor. Some Tirocchi clients purchased designs by old favorites from the 'Teens, like Agnes, Callot Soeurs, Jeanne Lanvin, Poiret, and others. However, they bought a lot from the new designers Chanel and Patou (who was the special favorite of the young set).

The technological development of new fabrics and new closures in clothing were affecting fashions of the 20s. Natural fabrics such as cotton and wool were the abundant fabrics of the decade. century, "artificial silk" was first made from a solution of cellulose in France. After being patented in the United States, the first American plant began production of this new fabric in 1910; this fiber became known as rayon.

Rayon stockings became popular in the decade as a substitute for silk stockings. Rayon was also used in some undergarments. Many garments before the 1920s were fastened with buttons and lacing, however, during this decade, the development of varieties of metal hooks and eyes meant that there were easier means of fastening clothing shut.

Hooks and eyes, buttons,zippers or snaps were all utilized to fasten clothing. Although 1930s fashions started out much like the flamboyant fashions of the 1920s, by the end of that year the effects of the Great Depression could be seen. More muted colors were popular in the fashions of both men and women, with the hemlines of women's skirts becoming longer once again.

Shoulders became an important focus of this decade. Heavily padded jackets for both women and men became the fashion, as did padded dresses for women. This fashion of the 1930s saw a turn back to the more conservative nature of clothing.

These included more muted colors as well as a drop in hemlines for women's dresses. More flowing styles in both women's fashions as well as men's were popular during this time period. en's formal wear included white suit jackets or a waist length mess jacket with a cummerbund and black pants for summer-time wear. With an emphasis still on the shoulders and the natural waistline, short jackets and dresses with a fitted midriff drew the eyes toward the shoulder.

Toward the end of the decade, 1930s fashion included evening gowns for women that featured halter or other high necklines, sleeves and plunging, bare backs. Matching jackets were often included as well. Suits that were more formal were still worn during business transactions. These differed from those that were looser as seen in more casual situations.

Bold neckties with geometric patterns did provide a bit of personality to the ensemble, however. Women wore dresses with matching jackets. Hemlines began to fall to below the knee, particularly during the last half of the decade. Men's suits featuring heavily padded shoulders as well as generously cut jackets signaled a softer and more flexible fashion for the 1930s. Fuller sleeves and tapered pants made the suits flattering for men, rather than stiff and rigid. Flowing trousers with long coats, often dubbed zoot suits, were popular as casual wear for men.

Musicians continued to be major influences on 1930s fashion. They made the exaggerated shoulder pads and long flowing trousers of the day even more popular as they wore their zoot suits. Long coats with high waists and pegged, wide legged trousers were a staple of their clothing. Movies played a heavy influence on fashions of the 1930s. Movies such as "Gone With the Wind," influenced the popularity of leg o' mutton sleeves and other puffed sleeves on dresses.

Full skirts were brought back into fashion by Scarlet O'Hara's famous barbecue dress. The Duchesses of Windsor helped to bring back the long flowing wedding dress after she wore this type for her 1937 wedding to Edward VIII, Prince of Wales. When Queen Elizabeth visited the New York World's Fair in 1939, she wore a short sleeved dress with long gloves. A dramatic hat completed her look.



The straight-line chemise topped by the close-fitting cloche hat became the uniform of the day. Women "bobbed," or cut, their hair short to fit under the popular hats, a radical move in the beginning, but standard by the end of the decade. Low-waisted dresses with fullness at the hemline allowed women to kick up their heels literally in new dances like the Charleston. Jean Patou, a new designer on the French scene, began making two-piece sweater and skirt outfits in luxurious wool jersey and had an instant hit for his morning dresses and sports suits. American women embraced the clothes of the designer as perfect for their increasingly active lifestyles.

By the end of the Twenties, Elsa Schiaparelli stepped onto the stage to represent a younger generation. She combined the idea of classic design from the Greeks and Romans (think "tunic") with the modern imperative for freedom of movement. Schiaparelli wrote that the ancient Greeks "gave to their goddesses ... the serenity of perfection and the fabulous appearance of freedom." Her own interpretation produced gowns of elegant simplicity. Departing from the chemise, her clothes returned to an awareness of the body beneath the gown. In the world of art, fashion was being influenced heavily on art movements such as surrealism. After World War I, popular art saw a slow transition from the lush, curvilinear abstractions of art nouveau decoration to the more mechanized, smooth, and geometric forms of art deco.

Elsa Schiaparelli is one key Italian designer of this decade who was heavily influenced by the "beyond the real" art and incorporated it into her designs. During the Twenties, Tirocchi clients asked for designs by known designers rather than work with Madame Tirocchi directly to create gowns for them. Most of these dresses were copies produced by New York fashion houses like Harry Angelo and Maginnis & Thomas, although some came from the New York City department stores B. Altman and Lord and Taylor.

Some Tirocchi clients purchased designs by old favorites from the 'Teens, like Agnes, Callot Soeurs, Jeanne Lanvin, Poiret, and others. However, they bought a lot from the new designers Chanel and Patou (who was the special favorite of the young set). The technological development of new fabrics and new closures in clothing were affecting fashions of the 20s.

Natural fabrics such as cotton and wool were the abundant fabrics of the decade. century, "artificial silk" was first made from a solution of cellulose in France. After being patented in the United States, the first American plant began production of this new fabric in 1910; this fiber became known as rayon. Rayon stockings became popular in the decade as a substitute for silk stockings. Rayon was also used in some undergarments.

Many garments before the 1920s were fastened with buttons and lacing, however, during this decade, the development of varieties of metal hooks and eyes meant that there were easier means of fastening clothing shut. Hooks and eyes, buttons,zippers or snaps were all utilized to fasten clothing. Although 1930s fashions started out much like the flamboyant fashions of the 1920s, by the end of that year the effects of the Great Depression could be seen. More muted colors were popular in the fashions of both men and women, with the hemlines of women's skirts becoming longer once again.

Shoulders became an important focus of this decade. Heavily padded jackets for both women and men became the fashion, as did padded dresses for women. This fashion of the 1930s saw a turn back to the more conservative nature of clothing. These included more muted colors as well as a drop in hemlines for women's dresses. More flowing styles in both women's fashions as well as men's were popular during this time period. en's formal wear included white suit jackets or a waist length mess jacket with a cummerbund and black pants for summer-time wear.

With an emphasis still on the shoulders and the natural waistline, short jackets and dresses with a fitted midriff drew the eyes toward the shoulder. Toward the end of the decade, 1930s fashion included evening gowns for women that featured halter or other high necklines, sleeves and plunging, bare backs. Matching jackets were often included as well. Suits that were more formal were still worn during business transactions. These differed from those that were looser as seen in more casual situations. Bold neckties with geometric patterns did provide a bit of personality to the ensemble, however. Women wore dresses with matching jackets.

Hemlines began to fall to below the knee, particularly during the last half of the decade. Men's suits featuring heavily padded shoulders as well as generously cut jackets signaled a softer and more flexible fashion for the 1930s. Fuller sleeves and tapered pants made the suits flattering for men, rather than stiff and rigid. Flowing trousers with long coats, often dubbed zoot suits, were popular as casual wear for men. Musicians continued to be major influences on 1930s fashion.

They made the exaggerated shoulder pads and long flowing trousers of the day even more popular as they wore their zoot suits. Long coats with high waists and pegged, wide legged trousers were a staple of their clothing. Movies played a heavy influence on fashions of the 1930s. Movies such as "Gone With the Wind," influenced the popularity of leg o' mutton sleeves and other puffed sleeves on dresses.

Full skirts were brought back into fashion by Scarlet O'Hara's famous barbecue dress. The Duchesses of Windsor helped to bring back the long flowing wedding dress after she wore this type for her 1937 wedding to Edward VIII, Prince of Wales. When Queen Elizabeth visited the New York World's Fair in 1939, she wore a short sleeved dress with long gloves. A dramatic hat completed her look.


 Cooper jeans


Jeans were strictly for workman in the first three decades of the century. In 1908, Morris Cooper created a work-wear production company in his own name. By the 1910s, 600 people were employed in the Morris Cooper factory in London, producing work-wear clothing from durable and versatile fabrics for various trades. Popular at the time were the Bib-and- Brace overalls. With the arrival of the first world war, the company converted its production to military uniforms. In 1931, the company was renamed “M Cooper Overalls Limited”, and in 1937 opened up a new factory in Stratford East London.

Throughout the 1930s and early '40s, a second influence vied with the Paris couturiers as a wellspring for new fashion ideas: the American cinema. Paris designers such as Schiaparelli and Lucien Lelong acknowledged the impact of film costumes on their work. LeLong said "We, the couturiers, can no longer live without the cinema anymore than the cinema can live without us. We corroborate each others' instinct.

The 1890s leg-o-mutton sleeves designed by Walter Plunkett for Irene Dunne in 1931's Cimarron helped to launch the broad-shouldered look,and Adrian's little velvet hat worn tipped over one eye by Greta Garbo in Romance (1930) became the "Empress Eugenie hat ... Universally copied in a wide price range, it influenced how women wore their hats for the rest of the decade." Movie costumes were covered not only in film fan magazines, but in influential fashion magazines such as Women's Wear Daily, Harper's Bazaar, and Vogue. Adrian's puff-sleeved gown for Joan Crawford Letty Lynton was copied by Macy's in 1932 and sold over 500,000 copies nationwide.

The most influential film of all was 1939's Gone with the Wind. Plunkett's "barbecue dress" for Vivien Leigh as Scarlett O'Hara was the most widely copied dress after the Duchess of Windsor's wedding costume, and Vogue credited the "Scarlett O'Hara" look with bringing full skirts worn over crinolines back into wedding fashion after a decade of sleek, figure-hugging styles. By the early 1930s, the "drape cut" or "London Drape" suit championed by Frederick Scholte, tailor to the Prince of Wales, was taking the world of men's fashion by storm.

The new suit was softer and more flexible in construction than the suits of the previous generation; extra fabric in the shoulder and armscye, light padding, a slightly nipped waist, and fuller sleeves tapered at the wrist resulted in a cut with flattering folds or drapes front and back that enhanced a man's figure. The straight leg wide-trousers (the standard size was 23 inches at the cuff) that men had worn in the 1920s also became tapered at the bottom for the first time around 1935.

The new suit was adopted enthusiastically by Hollywood stars including Fred Astaire, Cary Grant, and Gary Cooper, who became the new fashion trend setters after the Prince's abdication and exile. By the early 1940s, Hollywood tailors had exaggerated the drape to the point of caricature, outfitting film noir mobsters and private eyes in suits with heavily padded chests, enormous shoulders, and wide flowing trousers.

Musicians and other fashion experimenters adopted the most extreme form of the drape, the zoot suit, with very high waists, pegged trousers, and long coats. Roberto Capucci (born December 2, 1930) is an Italian fashion designer, known for his extravagant and ingeniously constructed outfits. Known as "the Givenchy of Rome" Capucci was born in Rome in 1929. He studied at the Accademia delle Belle Arti in Rome. His first job was with the designer Emilio Schuberth. In 1950, he established his own fashion house.

Creating unusual, sculpted dresses in original materials, Capucci bewitched the fashion world and has, since his debut, been featured in shows representing most talented and renowned designers. He opened a couture salon in Paris in 1962, but later returned to Rome, re-establishing himself in the via Gregoriana. He withdrew from the formal fashion world in 1980, preferring to present a single collection each year in a different city. He did this from 1982–1996.he has also designed uniforms for the staff of Jet Airways, India's biggest airline.


French fashion shows 1930


Prior to World War II - 1939 1945, New York fashion designers made the trek across the Atlantic Ocean to attend the flamboyant and opulent French fashion shows each year. They then returned to the United States and copied the latest Parisian haute couture designs. Once the Germans occupied Paris and the United States stationed battleships in the Atlantic Ocean, the New York designers were cut off from Paris haute couture. In their attempts to design new fashions for the United States market, they concentrated on sportswear. This led to the United States emerging as the sportswear capital of the world. In 1941, war good manufacturing took center stage. The government confiscated all stock of natural fabrics, forcing domestic manufacturers to concentrate on substituting other fibers for domestic garments. The industry geared up rayon production. Nylon stockings disappeared in 1943.

During 1942, the War Production Board began severely restricting the amount of yardage used in garments. On March 8, 1942 the War Production Board issued regulation L - 85, which regulated every aspect of clothing. Stanley Marcus was the apparel consultant to the War Production Board. At this time he took the stand that it was the designers patriotic duty to design fashions which would remain stylish through multiple seasons.

Through the mid-1930's, the natural waistline was often accompanied by emphasis on an empire line, this can be seen in the photo above, as well as through the few fashion photobooks from the war period. Short bolero jackets, capelets, and dresses cut with fitted midriffs or seams below the bust increased the focus on breadth at the shoulder.

By the late '30s, emphasis was moving to the back, with halter necklines and high-necked but backless evening gowns with sleeves.Evening dresses with matching jackets were worn to the theatre, nighclubs, and elegant restaurants. Skirts remained at mid-calf length for day, but the end of the 1930s Paris designers were showing fuller skirts reaching just below the knee; this practical length (without the wasteful fullness) would remain in style for day dresses through the war years.

Other notable fashion trends in this period include the introduction of the ensemble (matching dresses or skirts and coats) and the handkerchief skirt, which had many panels, insets, pleats or gathers. The clutch coat was fashionable in this period as well; it had to be held shut as there was no fastening. By 1945, adolescents began wearing loose, poncho-like sweaters called sloppy joes. Full, gathered skirts, known as the dirndl skirt, became popular around 1945.


sensuous look of the 1930s


The flapper dress of the The 1920s gave way to the glamorous, sensuous look of the 1930s. The big-band swing era provided a perfect backdrop for dresses that clung to the body above the hips and draped in graceful folds below. Hemlines fell and the backless evening gown gained immense popularity. In 1930 the fashion writer for the chic magazine New Orleanian recommended a twenty-five-dollar metallic-cloth dress with Grecian lines as "very apropos for the young matron" at a Carnival ball.

During the decade, Hollywood began to influence fashion. Joan Crawford's 1932 role in Letty Lynton helped narrow hips. During World War II, the War Production Board sought to conserve fabric. Its L-85 order prohibited full skirts and knife pleats, while another order limited the use of lace and embroidery. Despite these restrictions, American designers came into their own due to loss of communication with the French during the Nazi occupation.

Throughout the 1930s and early '40s, a second influence vied with the Paris couturiers as a wellspring for new fashion ideas: the American cinema. Paris designers such as Schiaparelli and Lucien Lelong acknowledged the impact of film costumes on their work. Le Long said "We, the couturiers, can no longer live without the cinema any more than the cinema can live without us. We corroborate each others' instinct. The lighthearted, forward-looking attitude and fashions of the late 1920s lingered through most of 1930, but by the end of that year the effects of the Great Depression began to affect the public, and a more conservative approach to fashion displaced that of the 1920s.

For women, skirts became longer and the waist-line was returned up to its normal position in an attempt to bring back the traditional "feminine" look. Other aspects of fashion from the The 1920s took longer to phase out. Cloche hats remained popular until about 1933 while short hair remained popular for many women until late in the 1930s.

Jean Patou, who had first raised hemlines to 18" off the floor with his "flapper" dresses of 1924, had begun lowering them again in 1927, using Vionnet's handkerchief hemline to disguise the change. By 1930, longer skirts and natural waists were shown everywhere. But it is Schiaparelli who is credited with "changing the outline of fashion from soft to hard, from vague to definite." She introduced the zipper, synthetic fabrics, simple suits with bold color accents, tailored evening dresses with matching jackets, wide shoulders, and the color shocking pink to the fashion world.

By 1933, the trend toward wide shoulders and narrow waists had eclipsed the emphasis on the hips of the later 1920s. Wide shoulders would remain a staple of fashion until after the war. Gloves were "enormously important" in this period.Evening gowns were accompanied by elbow length gloves, and day costumes were worn with short or opera-length gloves of fabric or leather.

Manufacturers and retailers introduced coordinating ensembles of hat, gloves and shoes, or gloves and scarf, or hat and bag, often in striking colors.For spring 1936, Chicago's Marshall Field's department store offered a black hat by Lilly Daché trimmed with an antelope leather bow in "Pernod green, apple blossom pink, mimosa yellow or carnation blush" and suggested a handbag to match the bow.


1930 stockings


Garter belt is a woman's undergarment consisting of an elastic piece of cloth worn around the waist to which garters are attached to hold up stockings. In British English they are also known as suspender belts. The garter belt was the vintage precursor to panty-hose (tights in British English). A return to retro styled garter belts and stockings has become especially popular due to the ultra feminine iconization of pin up girls of the past. Once a forgotten and overlooked undergarment from the past, the popularity of garter belts and matching stockings have made a terrific comeback with most modern department stores selling a wide assortment.

Glamour, conservativeness and femininity were the defining words of 1930s female fashions. Whereas a youth culture had sprung up and taken firm hold throughout the fashion world during the roaring 1920s, the stock market crash in October 1929 reverberated in every aspect of society, so that by 1930, the Great Depression had settled in and everyone wanted adults in charge.

Thus, women’s clothes went from loose tops and dresses that ended at the knees to form-fitting garments that fell to the mid-calf for day wear and to the floor for evening gowns. A conservative, traditional look was desired by both men and women. This is not to say that all youthfulness was stripped from women’s clothing. Some fashions of the 1930s woman were almost oppressively girlish, with giant ruffles and bows at the neck and shoulders.

Peter Pan collars were seen on a lot of day wear, even for adult women. And although the hard times demanded a lot of practicality, there were still many fussy, absurd hats and winter coats that didn’t fasten up the front. On the other side, suits and even trousers were becoming more popular as more women entered the workforce and everyone had less time for frivolity.

Austerity also affected men's civilian clothes during the war years. The British "Utility Suit" and American "Victory Suit" were both made of wool-synthetic blend yarns, without pleats, cuffs (turn-ups), sleeve buttons or patch pockets; jackets were shorter, trousers were narrower, and double-breasted suits were made without vests (waistcoats). Men who were not in unform could, of course, continue to wear pre-war suits they already owned, and many did so.


zoot suit 1930


A zoot suit has high-waisted, wide-legged, tight-cuffed pegged trousers (called tramas) and a long coat (called the carlango) with wide lapels and wide padded shoulders. Often zoot suiters wear a felt hat with a long feather (called a tapa or tanda) and pointy, French-style shoes (called calcos). A young Malcolm X described the zoot suit as: "a killer-diller coat with a drape shape, reet pleats and shoulders padded like a lunatic's cell."

Zoot suits usually featured a key chain dangling from the belt to the knee or below, then back to a side pocket. Zoot suits were for special occasions such as a dance or a birthday party. The amount of material and tailoring required made them luxury items.

Many young people wore a more moderate version of the "extra-bagged" pants or styled their hair in the signature "duck tail". The oversized suit was an extravagant personal style and a declaration of freedom and auto-determination; although many people still consider it a "rebellious garment to the era."

During the early years of the 1910s the fashionable silhouette became much more lithe, fluid and soft than in the 1900s. When the mohohuiBallets Russes performed Scheherazade in Paris in 1910, a craze for Orientalism ensued. The couturier Paul Poiret was one of the first designers to translate this vogue into the fashion world. Poiret's clients were at once transformed into harem girls in flowing pantaloons, turbans, and vivid colors and geishas in exotic kimono.

Paul Poiret also devised the first outfit which women could put on without the help of a maid. The Art Deco movement began to emerge at this time and its influence was evident in the designs of many couturiers of the time. Simple felt hats, turbans, and clouds of tulle replaced the styles of headgear popular in the 1900s.

It is also notable that the first real fashion shows were organized during this period in time, by the first female couturier, Jeanne Paquin, who was also the first Parisian couturier to open foreign branches in London, Buenos Aires, and Madrid.

Two of the most influential fashion kjreflected light. His distinguished customers never lost a taste for his fluid lines and flimsy, diaphanous materials. While obeying imperatives that left little to the imagination of the couturier, Doucet was nonetheless a designer of immense taste and discrimination, a role many have tried since, but rarely with Doucet's level of success.


1930s children's clothing


Daniel Cook's thought-provoking examination of the children's clothing industry in the United States sheds new light on the development of children's consumer culture in the twentieth century. Focusing on the years between 1917, when the children's wear industry launched its first trade journal, and the end of the baby boom in the early 1960s, Cook demonstrates how children's wear became increasingly age segmented as merchants and manufacturers began designing goods and retail spaces with children's needs and desires in mind.

Cook identifies the 1930s as the major turning point when merchants, manufacturers, and advertisers of children's wear recognized children rather than mothers as their primary consumer target. This shift, Cook argues, marked the emergence of a new marketing perspective--what Cook provocatively terms "pediocularity"--that viewed "the world through children's eyes" instead of a mother's eyes Cook provides an informative account of how children's wear merchandising became increasingly segmented and child focused. Before World War I merchandising of children's wear was rather limited.

Only one factory specialized in children's clothes before 1890, and mass merchandisers often stocked children's clothing with adult clothing in various departments throughout the store. Clothing, in other words, was organized by type rather than age. As publisher of the trade journal Infants' Department, George Earnshaw played a pivotal role in pressing retailers to devote floor space and specially trained salesclerks to children's departments. This strategy first gained traction in infants' departments, which courted the loyalty of mothers by hosting talks about infant care and staging baby contests during the U.S. Children's Bureau's "Baby Week" campaigns.

By the late 1920s, department stores and chains like Sears and Montgomery Ward began including children's departments that catered to school-age boys and girls. Most strikingly, in the 1930s children's clothing departments were divided and subdivided into a range of gender and age groupings. Cook highlights a variety of factors that made manufacturers more attentive to the child's point of view in the 1930s. Faced with shrinking markets in the Depression, merchants and manufacturers likely saw greater age segmentation as an opportunity to expand demand.

By recognizing that children possessed personal desires and stressing the importance of personality development, childrearing advice also helped legitimize the practice of giving children a greater say in their own clothing. In translating such advice, women's magazines encouraged parents to consider children's preferences and concerns about fitting in with their peers when selecting clothing.

They also suggested that allowing children to choose their clothing helped children learn good taste. Children's popular culture also advanced child-focused merchandising. Child stars like Jane Withers, Judy Garland, and Mickey Rooney all either had their own clothing lines or endorsed children's wear. Cook in particular credits Shirley Temple, whose own stage dresses and retail line of clothing had a toddler "look," for helping to make the toddler-size style range for girls a viable new merchandising category.



Wartime austerity lead to restrictions on the number of new clothes that people bought and the amount of fabric that clothing manufacturers could use. Women working on war service adopted trousers as a practical necessity. The nylon stocking was introduced in the US in 1940, to huge success, but later withdrawn as all supplies were needed for military uses such as parachutes. When nylon stockings reappeared in the shops there were "nylon riots" as customers fought over the first deliveries In Britain, clothing was strictly rationed, with a system of "points", and the Board of Trade issued regulations for "Utility Clothes" in 1941, and in America the War Production Board issued its Regulation L85 on March 8, 1942, specifying restrictions for every item of women's clothing.

Easily laddered stockings were a particular concern in Britain; women were forced to either paint them on (including the back seam) or to join the WRNS, who continued to issue them, in a cunning aid to recruitment. Later in the war, American soldiers became a source of the new nylon stockings. "In olden days a glimpse of stockings,

Was looked on as something shocking, Now heaven knows, Anything goes." -- Cole Porter Fashion of the 1930s was directly influenced by the Wall Street Crash of October 24, 1929 and the subsequent Depression. The Autumn, 1930 Sears Catalogue admonished, "Thrift is the spirit of the day. Reckless spending is a thing of the past." The focus turned away from new clothing for every season and moved to reusing and remaking the clothes one already owned.

The beginning of the decade saw women sewing more. Clothing was mended and patched before being replaced. It was also during this time that the practice of changing clothes several times each day fell out of style. (Before this time, many people had different outfits for morning, afternoon, and evening). A new passion for hiking, sports, sunbathing, and even nudism, invites briefer sportswear. Bathing suits are slashed and backless, made of linen and lastex yarn.

Bare midriffs are everywhere in the late 30's. Womens gloves usually matched their shoes and handbags. Hats were worn at an angle. Pill boxes became popular along with brimmed hats. Towards the end of the decade, turbans emerged. Fashionable hats range from the pillbox toque, trimmed turban, and Basque beret. Women of the 30's were quite pale since a suntan was seen as lower class.

Rouge, lipstick, and eye shadow were used to brighten their faces, and women used artificial eyelashes that took two hours to apply in a salon. Women's hair was fairly short and generally styled in finger-waves or soft curls with hardly any body. Sportswear has been called America's main contribution to the history of fashion design. The term became popular in the 1920s to describe relaxed, casual wear typically worn for spectator sports.

Since the 1930s the term is used to describe both day and evening fashions of varying degrees of formality that demonstrate this relaxed approach whilst remaining appropriate wear for many business or social occasions. Sportswear originally described clothing made specifically for sport. One of the first couturiers to specialise in this was John Redfern who in the 1870s began designing tailored garments for increasingly active women who rode, played tennis, went yachting, and did archery. Redfern's clothes, although intended for specific sporting pursuits, were adopted as everyday wear by his clients, making him probably the first sportswear designer.


Jean Patou


Some early 20th century Paris designers such as Gabrielle Chanel created haute couture designs that could be considered sportswear, though were not exclusively sportswear designers. Chanel promoted her own active, financially independent lifestyle through her relaxed jersey suits and uncluttered dresses. Other designers offering high end sportswear for resort wear included Jean Patou and Elsa Schiaparelli.

In contrast to the flexibility of American sportswear, these expensive couture garments were prescribed to be worn in very specific circumstances. The precursors of true sportswear emerged in New York before the Second World War. 1930s designers such as Clare Potter and Claire McCardell were among the first American designers to gain name recognition through their innovative clothing designs. Richard Martin described these designers as aiming to produce clothes demonstrating "problem-solving ingenuity and realistic lifestyle applications".

McCardell has been called America's greatest sportswear designer. Her simple, practical clothes suited the relaxed American dress code, neither formal nor informal, that became established during the 1930s and 1940s. Sportswear uses elements of sporty informal or casual wear such as Clare Potter's innovative evening sweater and evening skirt draped like a side saddle riding habit.

When people felt the negative impact of the Great Depression, designers stopped experimenting because of the lessened demand for clothes. Trends in women fashion though emphasized a romantic, womanly silhouette. The waist was brought back to its proper position, with hemlines being dropped.

Fashion emphasized on the bust, while backless evening gowns became the norm. The female body was modified to a more contemporary tone, while having athletic bodies became a trend. The popularity of having slim and toned down bodies resulted into couturiers to manufacture what is now known as the sportswear. While the concept of "ready-to-wear" was unknown then, boutiques were already making clothes known as being "for sport."


Madeleine Vionnet


In the 1930s, Elsa Schiaparelli with Madeleine Vionnet rose to prominence. Both were known for their innovative designs while not shattering the fundamentals of fashion. Schiaparelli became popular with her black knitted white bow. She became known for her exciting designs since then. Some of her noteworthy creations were the desk suit complemented with drawers for pockets, and the shoe-shaped hat. She also made silk dresses coloured with flies.

Vionet on the other hand got her inspiration in designing clothes from ancient statues. She created classical gowns that more often than not seemed taken out of a Greek frieze. She also manufactured dresses that suited the body less the unwarranted accessories, in turn creating a flowing and stylish line. By the time she retired at the end of the decade,

Vionnet had enjoyed a reputation among fashion industry movers. The year was 1914 and Madeleine Vionnet had just established her own maison of couture. She was already a seasoned dressmaker—she’d begun her first apprenticeship at age 11 nearly 30 years earlier—by the time World War I came banging down France’s door, and the designer responded by shuttering her own and fleeing to Rome. It might have been devastating timing for a lesser designer, but closing her Parisian atelier just two years after opening it provided the catalyst for Vionnet’s greatest inspirational encounters.

Once in Italy, Vionnet found herself immersed in the arts of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds. Those works became a fascination that would provide the basis of her style aesthetic from the time she returned to Paris and re-established her maison in 1919 until she died on this day in 1975, at the indomitable age of 98 years old. “I like to look at old costumes and fashions of times gone by because of what they say about their times,”

Vionnet explained in an interview published in French Vogue a month after her death. Vionnet’s designs were, “not for fashion,” she explained. “I only like that which lasts forever.” Certainly the flowing drapery and dynamic swaths of cloth that covered women in antiquity inspired her work, but Vionnet did more than give rise to a second renaissance for the classical era.

The genius behind Vionnet’s fluid yards of silks and chiffons, crepes and satins lay in the fresh way she cut those luxurious fabrics: The bias cut. Contrary to the practice of other dressmakers, Vionnet cut fabric not on the grain, but at a 45-degree angle to it. As a result, her silks, chiffons, crepes and satins gained a natural elasticity that followed the natural curves of the female body.

It was an inspiration that literally changed the silhouette of ladies dress. The new bias-cut brought a simplified ease to dressing, and it also brought its infamous body-clinging nature, the best of which was exhibited on Hollywood starlets such as Greta Garbo, Joan Crawford and Jean Harlow, who all wore Vionnet’s designs.

The essence of Vionnet’s sensibility was captured in 1931 by Vogue photographer George Hoyningen-Huene—the swirling yards of fabric enveloping the model evoking a modern-day Nike. The second World War marked the retirement of Vionnet. Over the next thirty years, Vionnet continued to live in Paris and mentor other designers, including Jacques Griffe. Like the art and architecture of ancient Greece and Rome—the muses of her creations—Vionnet’s designs remain as awe-inspiring today as they were a century ago.


double-breasted suit 1930


The decade of the 1930s saw dramatic changes in mens fashion. It began with the great Wall Street Crash of October 24, 1929. By 1931, eight million people were out of work in the United States. Less or no work meant little or no money to spend on clothing. The garment industry witnessed shrinking budgets, and going-out-of-business sales were prevalent. The Edwardian tradition of successive clothing changes throughout the day finally died.

Tailors responded to the change in consumer circumstances by offering more moderately priced styles. In the early part of the decade, mens suits were modified to create the image of a large torso. Shoulders were squared using wadding or shoulder pads and sleeves were tapered to the wrist. Peaked lapels framed the v-shaped chest and added additional breadth to the wide shoulders.

This period also was a rise in the popularity of the double-breasted suit, the precursor of the modern business suit. Masculine elegance demanded jackets with long, broad lapels, two, four, six or even eight buttons, square shoulders and ventless tails. Generous-cut, long trousers completed the look.

These suits appeared in charcoal, steel or speckled gray, slate, navy and midnight blue. Dark fabrics were enhanced by herringbone and stippled vertical and diagonal stripes. In winter, brown cheviot was popular. In spring, accents of white, red or blue silk fibers were woven into soft wool. The striped suit became a standard element in a mans wardrobe at this time.

Single, double, chalk, wide and narrow stripes were all in demand. The primary influence on the fashionable shape of the 1930s was the bias-cut dress introduced by Madame Madeleine Vionnet. Dress construction and fabric emphasized the female shape, creating a streamlined effect in keeping with the general aesthetic of the period. Fabrics were draped to create soft necklines and deep backs.

Evening clothes became more distinct from day wear; long gowns for women and tuxedos or tails for men were common attire for night clubs. Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers were paragons of style. As American designers such as Hattie Carnegie and Adele Simpson gained prominence during World War II, the silhouette became more curvaceous with a closely fitted bodice and waist.

The lighthearted, forward-looking attitude and fashions of the late 1920s lingered through most of 1930, but by the end of that year the effects of the Great Depression began to affect the public, and a more conservative approach to fashion displaced that of the 1920s. For women, skirts became longer and the waist-line was returned up to its normal position in an attempt to bring back the traditional "feminine" look.

Other aspects of fashion from the 1920s took longer to phase out. Cloche hats remained popular until about 1933 while short hair remained popular for many women until late in the 1930s. Through the mid-1930s, the natural waistline was often accompanied by emphasis on an empire line. Short bolero jackets, capelets, and dresses cut with fitted midriffs or seams below the bust increased the focus on breadth at the shoulder.

By the late '30s, emphasis was moving to the back, with halter necklines and high-necked but backless evening gowns with sleeves. Evening dresses with matching jackets were worn to the theatre, nightclubs, and elegant restaurants. Skirts remained at mid-calf length for day, but the end of the 1930s Paris designers were showing fuller skirts reaching just below the knee; this practical length (without the wasteful fullness) would remain in style for day dresses through the war years.


Half-stockings


Half-stockings, covering the foot and part of the calf only, are commonly called socks. This word is an adaptation of Latin soccus, a slipper or light shoe. It was the shoe worn by the actors in Roman comedy and so was used symbolically of comedy, as buskin, the high boot, was of tragedy. Pierre Balmain opened his own salon in 1945. It was in a series of collections named 'Jolie Madame' that he experienced his greatest success, from 1952 onwards.

Balmain's vision of the elegantly-dressed woman was particularly Parisian and was typified by the tailored glamour of the New Look, with its ample bust, narrow waist, and full skirts, by mastery of cut and imaginative assemblies of fabrics in subtle color combinations.

His sophisticated clientèle was equally at home with luxurious elegance, simple tailoring, and a more natural look. Along with his haute couture work, the talented businessman pioneered a ready-to-wear range called Florilege and also launched a number of highly successful perfumes. Menswear was also influenced by movies and its actors. "During the 1930s men also began to discard their undershirts supposedly because Clark Gable took off his shirt in a movie and only his bare chest was visible.

Warm shirts in large plaids, and early in the 30s the single breasted jacket was the male look. Later in the decade, double breasted jackets became popular yet again and the front of the man's jacket was higher. The outfits worn by the fashionable women of the 'Belle Époque' (as this era was called by the French) were strikingly similar to those worn in the heyday of the fashion pioneer Charles Worth.

By the end of the nineteenth century, the horizons of the fashion industry had generally broadened, partly due to the more mobile and independent lifestyle many well-off women were beginning to adopt and the practical clothes they demanded.

However, the fashions of the La Belle Époque still retained the elaborate, upholstered, hourglass-shaped style of the 1800s. As of yet, no fashionable lady would (or could) dress or undress herself without the assistance of a third party. The constant need for radical change, which is now essential for the survival of fashion within the present system, was still literally unthinkable.



Conspicuous waste and conspicuous consumption defined the fashions of the decade and the outfits of the couturiers of the time were incredibly extravagant, elaborate, ornate, and painstakingly made. The curvaceous S-Bend silhouette dominated fashion up until around 1908. The S-Bend corset was very tightly laced at the waist and so forced the hips back and the drooping mono bosom was thrust forward in a pouter pigeon effect creating an S shape.

Toward the end of the decade the fashionable silhouette gradually became somewhat more straight and slim, partly due to Paul Poiret's high-waisted, shorter-skirted Directoire line of clothes. The Maison Redfern was the first fashion house to offer women a tailored suit based directly on its male counterpart and the extremely practical and soberly elegant garment soon became an indispensable part of the wardrobe of any well-dressed woman.

Another indispensable part of the outfit of the well-dressed woman was the designer hat. Fashionable hats at the time were either tiny little confections that perched on top of the head, or large and wide brimmed, trimmed with ribbons, flowers, and even feathers. Parasols were still used as decorative accessories and in the summer they dripped with lace and added to the overall elaborate prettiness.

An umbrella or parasol (sometimes colloquially, gamp, brolly, umbrellery, or bumbershoot) is a canopy designed to protect against precipitation or sunlight. The term parasol usually refers to an item designed to protect from the sun, and umbrella refers to a device more suited to protect from rain. Often the difference is the material; some parasols are not waterproof.

Parasols are often meant to be fixed to one point and often used with patio tables or other outdoor furniture, or for shelter from the sun. Umbrellas are almost exclusively hand-held portable devices; however, parasols can also be hand-held.

Umbrellas can be held as fashion statements in the twenty first century for some men and women and are sometimes seen as simple accessories that complete an outfit. The word umbrella is from the Latin word umbra, which in turn derives from the Ancient Greek ómbros (όμβρος). Its meaning is shade or shadow. Brolly is a slang word for umbrella, used often in Britain, New Zealand and Australia. Bumbershoot is a fanciful Americanism from the late 19th century.


page-boy cuts 1930s


Short hair remained fashionable in the early 1930s, but gradually hair was worn longer in soft or hard curls. Most hairstyles were smooth at the crown to accommodate a hat, with curls framing the face and at the ends. By the early 1940s, shoulder length curls or page-boy cuts were most popular. Hair was also worn up with the curled ends piled on top of the head.

Through the mid '40s, hair was worn high over the forehead in a puff or in rolls, in a pompadour. Knotted hair cauls or hairnets, called snoods, of velvet or chenille yarn, were one of the historic revivals seen through out the period.

Hats were worn for most occasions, almost always tipped to one side and decorated with bits of net veiling, feathers, ribbons, or brooches. The popularity of stockings increases and decreases with fashion. It was formerly made of woven cloth but now of knitted wool, silk, cotton or nylon (see hosiery).

The word stock used to refer to the bottom "stump" part of the body, and by analogy the word was used to refer to the one-piece covering of the lower trunk and limbs essentially tights consisting of the upper-stocks (later to be worn separately as knee breeches) and nether-stocks (later to be worn separately as stockings).



The stock market crash of 1929 ushered in the financial and economic collapse of the 1930s. America had not seen such widespread economic hardship since the 1870s. All aspects of culture, including women's fashion, reflected in diverse ways the impact of the Depression ethos.

The autumn 1930 Sears Roebuck Catalogue instructs its readers: "Thrift is the spirit of the day. Reckless spending is a thing of the past." Although styles were changing dramatically, many women chose to make their own clothes to save money. In the boom of the 1920s, some of the surplus wealth created in the stock market had found its way into the pockets of the middle classes. Upper middle class women could afford the occasional high-fashion gown like the Callot Soeurs gown below.

Callot Soeurs couture dress of black silk with bands of gold lam, c.1924, sold by Vintage Textile. The design of the dress was inspired by the craze for Orientalism in all the decorative arts.

By 1932, the Roaring 1920s was ancient history. Economics is the main reason for the relative abundance of vintage clothing from the 1920s vs. the 1930s. Much less fine clothing was created in the 1930s in contrast to the abundant production during the prior decade.

During the 1930s, fashion trends were driven by more than practical economy. A different and seemingly contrary impulse had a powerful effect--the yearning for the unattainable, for the lost world of the 1920s, in short for glamour, the key concept in 1930s high style clothing.

A stylish upper middle class woman could no longer expect to purchase a Worth couture gown like this one.

Worth couture evening gown of sequinned tulle with asymmetrical floral spray design, plunging neckline, and back train, c.1930.

But she could still admire the fashionable clothing she saw in the movies or read about it in the society pages. Paradoxically, glamour in clothes was more important in the 1930s than it ever was before or since. Glamor signified romance and excitement, especially with an alluring, mysterious quality.

Glamorous sequinned, backless evening gown, c.1930.

Hollywood turned out dazzling, glitzy movies to appeal to the public's need for escapist fare. On the silver screen were wealth and glamour; outside the theatre was the grim reality of bankruptcies and breadlines.

George Orwell wrote in 1937 that the one thing since the war that made the greatest difference in the otherwise dreary outlook of Depression-era youth was the movies. "The girl who leaves school and gets a dead-end job can still look like a fashion-plate for a pittance. You may have pennies in your pocket and not a prospect in the world, and only the corner of a leaky bedroom to go home to; but in your new clothes, you can stand on the street corner, indulging in a private daydream of yourself as Marlene Dietrich..."


1930s ladies fashion coats

A period of time of love and also delicate extravagance, the 1930s had been a crucial period in girls design and style, wherever much less was absolutely more. Outfits were simple yet feminine, with both businesslike influences and more casual style. Wrap skirts, simple blouses, V-neck cardigans, long free-flowing dresses and short elegant jackets were just some of the elements represented during that time.

Perfection was represented by a look that was not only elegant and wealthy but also casual and fun. Clothes were regularly handmade, since the 1930 Sears Listing declared, "Thrift may be the spirit from the day. Reckless spending is usually a thing from the previous. Dresses An issue of Great Housekeeping by way of April 1930 means in people instances, dresses were designed to show away a female's feminine features when you're cinched in the waist.

These dresses were long and free-flowing, with low V-necklines and were known as the "1930s Trousseau." Since the dresses were elegant yet simple, they would be worn for tea time or lunch in high or middle class society. They were snug at the waist, then gathered or pleated, with a wider hem on the bottom, a pattern known as the "cross cut bias" style. The actual masturbator sleeves on these kinds of dresses had been 3/4 duration or smaller, and the true hem fell between your knees as well as the shin. The most used dress colors were red-colored, navy, whitened and dim. At times gowns were in addition to brief, sophisticated overcoats for official cuisine.

Daytime Outfits Simple day time clothing had been affected through businesslike design. These kinds of girlie outfits contain two-piece V-neck sweaters, easy blouses as well as button-down cover skirts. The look for both men and women in the 1930s was long and sleek. Skirts were often wider on the bottom and made of thick fabric, and blouses were made with shoulder pads to broaden the shoulders. V-neck styles were the most popular and were often accented with lace and ruffles. V-neck sweaters or cardigans were worn by women with long skirts. Standard materials incorporated tweed, 100 % cotton, rayon, manmade fiber and made of wall.

The hemline in daytime outfits reached mid-calf, and the skirts were full, designed to accentuate the waist and minimized the hips.Women's suits were well-tailored with feminine pleats, flares or straight styles and tightly fitted jackets. Dresses of evening outfits Evening garments for ladies in the precise 1930s contains ankle-length or even floor-length hemlines. Dresses or skirts for the evening were full and accentuated the waist. They commonly had flounces, seams or pleats, and were made of similar fabrics as the daytime skirts and dresses.These long skirts and dresses were long and slender, often featuring ruffles or flares.Reduced necklines, gentle gathers, ruffled collars as well as scallop-edged necklines were some well-known options that come with night-time put on. Many night time clothes had been backless, along with bloused bodices as well as fox furs.

A well-known costume layout was the actual empire-waist dress tied in the back, based on Just the particular Swing, an excellent on the internet 1930s style source. Lounge Wear Necklines will be decorated along with flowers as well as bows. Silk gowns became well-known within the late 1930s. Over the genuine summers, lounge wear includes shorts as well as play-suits produced from cotton and even rayon. Dressier home dresses may very well be used with regard to social events in your own home or perhaps for handmade cards. In the 1930s, clothes had been usually put on all day long quite compared to being changed often times during the day for several occasions.


1930s UK Fashion

The particular decade from the 1930s had been centered by means of one massive historical occasion -- the truly amazing Depression borne from the Wall Road Crash related to 1929. Steadily, as the actual magnitude of the economic catastrophe sank within, people begun to recognize these people lived inside a new period of austerity.

When it comes to design, this kind of supposed how the excesses as well as extravagances from the previous 10 years, as everyone was appearing out of the actual gloom as well as horrors related to World Battle One, had been replaced via more affordable, simpler and even more sensible models. Men The 1930s dresses saw a finish to the genuine Edwardian designs as well as strategies to altering clothes as well as clothes during the day were discarded in support of much more frugal methods of dressing.

The wide-shoulder suit became popular in an attempt to present the male torso in as favorable light as possible.Suits were made square across the shoulder to gain this effect and the double-breasted suit also appeared as a precursor to the modern suit of today. V-necked knit tops also debuted once again in a different make an effort to boost masculinity inside a period associated with austerity. Women Women's styles were furthermore affected through austerity, yet there is still an increased exposure of dressing regarding diverse situations of day time and activities.

Greta Garbo, the planning icon of times, was significantly influential and many ladies aspired in order to copy the woman's sophisticated appear.Long and sleek was in vogue and clinging fabrics were enormously popular. Daytime hemlines were raised slightly yet significantly to mid-calf while full-ankle hems were still the fashion in the evenings. Hair was short and wavy and because tanning was frowned upon as lower class, women brightened their faces with rouge, lipstick, eyeshadow and artificial lashes.

General Gown The new austerity meant that there was a new emphasis on recycling or repairing clothing. Women accessorized to change their look rather than buy new fashions with every changing season. For women and men, sportswear as well as casual garments became popular. V-necked vests as well as sweaters were put into the traditional three-piece match. In swim wear, styles grew to become far more colorful with the transforming social norms, a lot more flesh had been exposed.


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