The 1920’s have been called the Lost Generation, the Age of the Flapper, the Jazz Age, and the Roaring Twenties. All attempt to identify a common theme, and all fail. Not everyone in the 1920’s was a lost intellectual, a thoroughly "Modern Milly," a jazz aficionado, or an exuberant bon vivant. Of course, they were all present along with the unemployed, the disadvantaged coal miner, the struggling farmer, the religious fundamentalist, the agnostic, the atheist.

The 1920’s, saw dramatic changes in dress, and became the first modern" decade of the twentieth century. The  female body evolved from the elaborately trimmed dress with its high waist position and ankle length skirt at the beginning, to the simple, hardly decorated, shapeless tube with a hip level waistline and a skirt barely covering the knees.

The new fashion boom began with their change in social aspects and attitudes along with their new way of life. This was the Jazz Age, the decade of the flappers.



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The Jazz age had a profound impact on clothing, both for men and women. World War 1 was over, and the culture was quickly changing and evolving. The class system seemed to disappear and attitudes changed dramatically, especially among the youth of the era. As society went through rapid changes, mens fashion began to become more interesting and creative. For centuries, men had worn a similar outfit, with few if any changes to it. In the 1920s, we see an introduction to sports wear, or wearing what the sports icons wore. We also see the younger generation rebelling against tradition and creating a new style that was better suited for comfort. Fabrics were lighter, and colours more varied than they had been in years, reflecting the changing cultural attitude of the people.

The young men wore baggy plus fours and wide legged trousers. The plus fours were another way the sports industry affected fashion, as this look was first introduced by famous golfers. Golfers also began a trend with the infamous Fair Isle sweater, which quickly caught on among men throughout society. Tennis also impacted fashion, as it grew more popular.

The white trousers and v-neck sweaters were popular for a night out on the town. In centuries past, menswear had been extremely formal, to the point of upper-class men in Edwardian times having to change their clothing several times a day to meet proprieties needs. A suit and neck tie of some form was essentially always worn, though in the 1920s the suit became much simpler. The suit jacket became slimmer and unpadded, and worn over simple trousers.

The baggy trousers originated at Oxford University, due to a ban on knickerbockers; so they were called Oxford bags. As a result, trousers in the 1920s grew continuously wider in the legs, leading to the development of the front crease. This allowed for a sharper look, especially in silhouette. Suspenders became a hold of the older generation as belts took over, their waist slimming feature especially made them popular. Cuffs were added to trousers, giving them a more finished look.

With men's fashions changing so dramatically, it may seem surprising to note that formal wear remained much the same for men as it had for centuries. Granted, the frock coat was replaced by the tail coat, but that was basically the only change. The jacket still had to be black, and men still had to wear a starched white shirt and bow-tie in the evenings, with black trousers and black shoes.

Of course, we must not forget the hat! For centuries past, and into the 1920s, no man who had any style or manners went anywhere in public without a hat of some sort covering his head. In the summer, light straw hats or shallow stiff-brimmed hats called boaters or skimmers could be worn to meet that obligation, while in the winter, the felt fedora ruled the day.

The boaters and skimmers differed only in the width of their brim. The felt fedora is best known today as a gangsters hat, but it was loved by most men because of its comfort. In the 1920s, the rising economic times and rise of the auto-mobile meant that clothing designers took note. They began to create clothing to be worn exclusively while driving, such as the flat English driving hat and vented leather gloves.

These were considered essential when taking your sweetheart for a drive. Of course, other cultural icons, such as aviator Charles Lindbergh, also impacted fashion. His leather coat became popular, and many men liked to wear the scarf too. The jacket was considered a necessity, in fact, with no man of style wanting to be without one. The fashion of the 20s was jazzy, with a pop and sizzle all its own.

This would last until the stock market crash of 1929, when money became too tight for fashion. Though it would take the fashion industry years to listen and cater to the young again as much as they did in the 20s, there was no chance of a return to the dress codes and expectations of centuries past. Youth had had its say, and wouldnt go back. Stuffiness in dress was over; it was the dawn of a new age.


1920 shoes


The 1920s women's shoes caused quite a debatable among the society of the streets of those days because many pivotal and changing events took place leading up to the change of shoe wear for women as well as the dress of women. It was the 1920s women's shoes that were first seen by others as women generally dressed with their skirts right down to the ground and were often seen sweeping all around them as they walked. However, it was due to this very unwanted dirt on the skirt bottoms that provoked the new style as well as the cause for introducing the 1920s women's shoes.

It happened just before the 1920s women's shoes became popular, famous and widely controversial that the skirts of the women were raised just four inches from the floor. This change or desired change, grew panic and gasps from the men and other women in the general society but because of the horse faeces so commonly found, and walked through in the streets in those days, the women felt it was not only wanted by other women but it was imperative for the cleanliness of the skirt. Well four inches up reveals quite a lot more than a full-length skirt that covered feet and legs because now there was four inches of bare leg as well as exposing the feet.

The 1920s women's shoes had to be reinvented because there wasn't much significance put on women's shoes at that time, why would there be, they weren't seen except sitting in the porch. Now it was essential that the 1920s women's shoes be emphasized due to this change in attire and the number and types of shoes skyrocketed. Soon it was introduced in the realm of the 1920s women's shoes the still famous and often still worn shoe that was high heeled and had extremely pointy narrow toes.

These were highly criticized because of the terrible support and the very uncomfortable nature of shoes. The 1920s women's shoes had a full frontal attack released on them trying to discourage the sales of these shoes because they were terrible for the health for the feet and it isn't an old wives tale that tight shoes destroy character. They do and we know this today but in the era of the 1920s women's shoes, they choose fashion as first and comfort as dead last.



By the end of the First World War, many changes in fashion came about. Short bobs became in, as well as pinafores worn above the knee. Corsets were gone, and women suddenly dressed like boys. The androgynous style soon became the in thing by 1925. Sportswear became hot trends among men and women, with popular designers Jean Patou with Coco Chanel helping popularize the athletic look. Chanel was one of the most popular fashion movers of the era, as she was responsible for introducing chic and futuristic designs. She helped in making popular the bob hairstyle, use of jersey knit among women, as well as use of the little black dress. She also made popular the use of jewellery and knitwear among her clients.

After World War I, America entered a prosperous era and, as a result of its role in the war, came out onto the world stage. Social customs and morals were relaxed in the optimism brought on by the end of the war and the booming of the stock market. Soldiers were returning home from serving or attending a military university to be with their families or find jobs and Women started entering the workforce in record numbers during the time. The nationwide prohibition on alcohol was ignored by many. There was a revolution in almost every sphere of human activity, and fashion was no exception.

Clothing changed with women's changing roles in modern society, particularly with the idea of new fashion. Although society matrons of a certain age continued to wear conservative dresses, forward-looking and younger women now made sportswear into the greatest change in postwar fashion. The tubular dresses of the 'teens had evolved into a similar silhouette that now sported shorter skirts with pleats, gathers, or slits to allow motion. Undergarments began to transform after World War I to conform to the ideals of a flatter chest and more boyish figure. The corset was diminishing and the bandeau, flattening style was prevalent in the early 1920s. During the mid-twenties all-in-one lingerie became popular, leaving behind the corset and moving into the curvier brassiere era of the 1930s.

The women's rights movement had a strong effect on women's sexual fashions. Most importantly, the confining corset was discarded, as undergarments changed to suit the new fashions in this decade. Instead of drawers and knickers, women now wore panties, which were more comfortable. The chemise or camisole was employed in place of the corset.

During the early part of the decade, chemises paired with bloomers kept a woman covered beneath her outer garments. For the first time in centuries, women's legs were seen with hemlines rising to the knee and dresses becoming more fitted. A more masculine look became popular, including flattened breasts and hips, short hairstyles such as the bob cut, Eton Crop and the Marcel Wave. One of the first women to wear trousers, cut her hair and reject the corset was Coco Chanel. Probably the most influential woman in fashion of the 20th century, Coco Chanel did much to further the emancipation and freedom of women's fashion.


women's fashion 1920


The straight-line chemise topped by the close-fitting cloche hat became the uniform of the day. Women “bobbed,” or cut, their hair short to fit under the popular hats, a radical move in the beginning, but standard by the end of the decade. Low-waisted dresses with fullness at the hemline allowed women to kick up their heels literally in new dances like the Charleston.

Jean Patou, a new designer on the French scene, began making two-piece sweater and skirt outfits in luxurious wool jersey and had an instant hit for his morning dresses and sports suits. American women embraced the clothes of the designer as perfect for their increasingly active lifestyles.

By the end of the Twenties, Elsa Schiaparelli stepped onto the stage to represent a younger generation. She combined the idea of classic design from the Greeks and Romans (think “tunic”) with the modern imperative for freedom of movement. Schiaparelli wrote that the ancient Greeks “gave to their goddesses ... the serenity of perfection and the fabulous appearance of freedom.”

Her own interpretation produced gowns of elegant simplicity. Departing from the chemise, her clothes returned to an awareness of the body beneath the gown. In the world of art, fashion was being influenced heavily on art movements such as surrealism. After World War I, popular art saw a slow transition from the lush, curvilinear abstractions of art nouveau decoration to the more mechanized, smooth, and geometric forms of art deco. Elsa Schiaparelli is one key Italian designer of this decade who was heavily influenced by the “beyond the real” art and incorporated it into her designs.

During the Twenties, Tirocchi clients asked for designs by known designers rather than work with Madame Tirocchi directly to create gowns for them. Most of these dresses were copies produced by New York fashion houses like Harry Angelo and Maginnis & Thomas, although some came from the New York City department stores B. Altman and Lord and Taylor.

Some Tirocchi clients purchased designs by old favorites from the 'Teens, like Agnes, Callot Soeurs, Jeanne Lanvin, Poiret, and others. However, they bought a lot from the new designers Chanel and Patou (who was the special favorite of the young set).


During the first half of the century the bonnet dominated women’s fashion, becoming very large with many ribbons, flowers, feathers, and gauze trims giving an appearance of even greater size. By the end of the century, although bonnets were stili prevalent, many other styles were to be found, including wide brims with fiat crowns, the flower pot and the toque feathers and veils abandoned. Although early in the 1900's most hats were enormous and adorned with flowers, feathers, ribbon and tulle.... by the mid 1920's women’s hair had become much shorter with the shingle cut and the cloche, which hugged the head like a helmet with a very small brim, had come into fashion. Now, after WW l, there was suddenly such a proliferation of styles and materials that many women had to rely on the advice of milliners.

From the 1930’s to the 1950's it could be said that New York, with its many European immigrants had become the world’s leading millinery city, with department stores such as Sacs Fifth Avenue, Henri Bendel and Bergdorf Goodman leading the way with their own millinery workrooms. During the 1930's and 40’s the tendency was for hats to have higher crowns with smaller brims and once it was War-Time again, it was mainly the trims which were changed with women making do with turbans made from pre-war materials.

By the 1950’s the arrival of clothes was robbing the milliners of their crucial part in the world of fashion. Equally during the War many women, who had not previously worked, found themselves employed and were then ioathed to lose there new-found freedom and independence. This new situation meant, however, that they no longer had so much time or energy to spend on being fashionable.

Ln the 1960's, the hat was once again taken over by wigs and hairdressers, who colored, back­combed and sprayed women ’s hair into exotic ‘sculptures ’_ Both men and women also realized that they could dress less formally and the hat was inevitably a temporary casualty. However, in the 1980’s and 90’s there has been a revival of interest in women’s millinery. This was instigated, to a large extent, by public: figures such as the late Princess of WaIes’s enthusiasm for wearing in the 1960’s, the hat was once again taken over by wigs and hairdressers, who hats.

Many new hat designers have emerged because of this, and therefore has made the 90's a very innovative and diverse period for hats. Since their invention, hats have come and gone as status symbols, uniforms and fashion statements as weil as being functional sports and protective headgear. There are still, and presumably always will be, twc basic styles-brimmed and brimless...and two basic forms-caps and hats. Milliners take these shapes and with the aid of many trims and details, create a never-ending range of hats formen and women.


Schiaparelli


Schiaparelli had been presenting thematic collections at her salon, theatrically staged with dramatic lighting, backdrops and music. A fashion editor who regularly attended these events recalls that the front rows were filled with royalty, politicians, artists, film stars who pushed towards the models “as if it were rush hour.” This sparkling and boldly decorated evening jacket is part of Schiaparelli’s Zodiac collection from Winter 1938/39 which was one of her most imaginative collections.

Clothing in this collection was decorated with the stars, the moon and the sun and horoscopes were printed on coats and jackets that foretold the future. The proportions of the clothing were built upon the strictest measurements based on Euclid’s elements, a treatise on geometry. As a young child, Elsa’s Uncle Giovanni had pointed out that the beauty marks on his niece’s face formed the shape of the Big Dipper so she adopted the constellation as her good luck charm.

This elaborate jacket is decorated with the signs of the zodiac and the planets, woven with gold and silver embroidery. chiaparelli’s symbol, the big dipper, is on the left shoulder. It would have been worn over a simple gown forming an “evening suit.” The Evening Suit, which was popularized by Schiaparelli, became a standard among fashionably dressed women..

In the 1920’s, the sweater was an important piece of clothing for a new type of “modern” woman who would rather play a game of tennis than sit still in a parlor. But sweaters of the time tended to lose their shape quickly which resulted in a sloppy appearance. In the Spring of 1927, Elsa Schiaparelli noticed a woman in Paris wearing a plain but unusually woven sweater, which didn’t seem to stretch and had what Schiaparelli later described as a “steady look.” Schiaparelli discovered that the sweater had been knitted by an Armenian woman using a special double layered stich. Elsa soon recruited the young woman to knit several prototypes for her.

Schiaparelli drew a white bow to look like a scarf tied around the neck of a sweater on a black background and had the design knitted into the sweaters. The sweater had its public debut when Elsa wore it to a luncheon that included several leaders of the fashion world. The sweater caused a sensation. A buyer from Lord and Taylor ordered 40 copies on the spot. Although her first collection launched the previous year had been well-received, it was the bow knot sweater which secured her fame.


1920 mens fashion


In centuries past, menswear had been extremely formal, to the point of upper-class men in Edwardian times having to change their clothing several times a day to meet proprieties needs. A suit and neck tie of some form was essentially always worn, though in the 1920s the suit became much simpler. The suit jacket became slimmer and un-padded, and worn over simple trousers.

The baggy trousers originated at Oxford University, due to a ban on knickerbockers; so they were called Oxford bags. As a result, trousers in the 1920s grew continuously wider in the legs, leading to the development of the front crease. This allowed for a sharper look, especially in silhouette. Suspenders became a hold of the older generation as belts took over, their waist slimming feature especially made them popular. Cuffs were added to trousers, giving them a more finished look.

With mens fashions changing so dramatically, it may seem surprising to note that formal wear remained much the same for men as it had for centuries. Granted, the frock coat was replaced by the tail coat, but that was basically the only change. The jacket still had to be black, and men still had to wear a starched white shirt and bow tie in the evenings, with black trousers and black shoes. Of course, we must not forget the hat!

For centuries past, and into the 1920s, no man who had any style or manners went anywhere in public without a hat of some sort covering his head. In the summer, light straw hats or shallow stiff-brimmed hats called boaters or skimmers could be worn to meet that obligation, while in the winter, the felt fedora ruled the day. The boaters and skimmers differed only in the width of their brim. The felt fedora is best known today as a gangsters hat, but it was loved by most men because of its comfort.



Fashion changes as time changes, but fashion never runs out of style. This means no matter how many times fashion changes itself, there will always be fashion. People may pass and generations may pass by, but fashion will surely last a lifetime. This is true, since in every period, era, or whatever you may call it, there is fashion. You may not get to experience their kind of fashion, but it doesn’t mean fashion did not exist during the older times. And that is why, it is good to look back on the older days like the 1920’s or the roaring twenties, and get a glimpse of their fashionable world.

First off, the decade of the 1920s saw dramatic social and economic change. The prosperity and opportunity during the aftermath of World War I left many individuals with a positive outlook. This widespread attitude encouraged the indulgence of many materialistic pleasures. Thus, the development of ladies fashion was related to this transformation. And with the passing of bustles and corsets gave clothing designers much greater freedom of expression. New and colourful fabrics echoed the joy felt by a war weary population following the end of hostilities.

Furthermore, it is in this year that women wore short hairs for the first time, in Europe. In the U.S, the hairstyle called bob hairstyles was reintroduced by actress Louise Brooks in the late 1920s. With this, the finger waves hairstyle became popular in the roaring twenties. In fact this FINGER WAVE is the most popular 1920’s hairstyles. Finger Wave hairstyle is the art of shaping or moulding hair while wet into "s"-shaped curved undulations with the fingers and comb. These waves when dried without being disturbed will fall into beautiful deep waves.

Now when it comes to dresses, the 1920’s dresses were lighter and brighter and shorter than ever before. Fashion designers played with fabric colors, textures and patterns to create totally new styles of dress which were called flapper dresses.

This is perhaps why this kind of fashion; short bobbed or shingled hair, straight loose knee-length dresses with a dropped waistline, silk or rayon stockings with garters, heavy makeup, and long beaded necklaces is stereotyped as Flapper fashion. Thus, the 1920’s fashion is often referred to as “the 1920’s flapper fashion”.

And with this new kind of fashion, the Roaring Twenties redefined womanhood — a new woman evolved. In fact, roaring twenties was considered to be the start of a new womanhood where it was more acceptable to smoke and drink in public, closer body contact in dancing, shorter hair, make-up, different styles of dress, and greater participation in the workforce.

Indeed, if you weren’t aware of this fashion history, you won’t know that the roaring twenties is the beginning of what you are, as a woman, now. This is the beginning of the phase where you can use your creativity when it comes to dressing yourself and styling your hair. In a great way, the 1920’s fashion plays a significant role in the fashion and women of today.

So, if you want to relive the past by experiencing the way the women in the 1920’s dress and style their hairs, you can! It is not so hard as long as you have a guide to dressing yourself and styling your hair in a fashionably “flapper” way. The good news is you can now get your own copy of the 1920’s hairstyle and dresses books. These books feature techniques on how you can do finger waving, and how you can whip up for yourself a flapper dress in an hour. Imagine, in an hour, you can actually live and relive the roaring past of the 1920’s.
The 1920s women's shoes caused quite a debacle among the society of the streets of those days because many pivotal and changing events took place leading up to the change of shoe wear for women as well as the dress of women. It was the 1920s women's shoes that were first seen by others as women generally dressed with their skirts right down to the ground and were often seen sweeping all around them as they walked. However, it was due to this very unwanted dirt on the skirt bottoms that provoked the new style as well as the cause for introducing the 1920s women's shoes.

It happened just before the 1920s women's shoes became popular, famous and widely controversial that the skirts of the women were raised just four inches from the floor. This change or desired change, grew panic and gasps from the men and other women in the general society but because of the horse feces so commonly found, and walked through in the streets in those days, the women felt it was not only wanted by other women but it was imperative for the cleanliness of the skirt.

Well four inches up reveals quite a lot more than a full-length skirt that covered feet and legs because now there was four inches of bare leg as well as exposing the feet. The 1920s women's shoes had to be reinvented because there wasn't much significance put on women's shoes at that time, why would there be, they weren't seen except sitting in the porch. Now it was essential that the 1920s women's shoes be emphasized due to this change in attire and the number and types of shoes sky rocketed.

Soon it was introduced in the realm of the 1920s women's shoes the still famous and often still worn shoe that was high heeled and had extremely pointy narrow toes. These were highly criticized because of the terrible support and the very uncomfortable nature of shoes. The 1920s women's shoes had a full frontal attack released on them trying to discourage the sales of these shoes because they were terrible for the health for the feet and it isn't an old wives tale that tight shoes destroy character. They do and we know this today but in the era of the 1920s womens shoes, they choose fashion as first and comfort as dead last.

Liberty store London


Liberty is a long-established department store on Regent Street in Central London, England, in the West End shopping district.
Since 1875, Liberty has been synonymous with luxury and great design. Arthur Liberty’s intuitive vision and pioneering spirit led him to travel the world looking for individual pieces to inspire and excite his discerning clientele. Liberty is not a name above the door, it’s Arthur Liberty’s legacy, which stands for integrity, value, quality and above all beautifully designed product. This vision and spirit continues today within the iconic Tudor building.


With a £2000 loan from his future father-in-law, Arthur Liberty took on the lease of half a shop at 218a Regent Street with only three staff.
The shop opened in 1875 selling ornaments, fabric and objects d'art from Japan and the East. Within eighteen months Arthur Liberty had repaid the loan and acquired the second half of 218 Regent Street. As the business grew, neighbouring properties were bought and added.


The  dress maker Charles Frederick Worth


The first designer who was not merely a dressmaker was Charles Frederick Worth (1826–1895). Before the former draper set up his maison couture fashion house in Paris, clothing design and creation was handled by largely anonymous people, and high fashion descended from style worn at royal courts. Worth's success was such that he was able to dictate to his customers what they should wear, instead of following their lead as earlier dressmakers had done. The term couturier was in fact first created in order to describe him.

It was during this period that many design houses began to hire artists to sketch or paint designs for garments. The images alone could be presented to clients much more cheaply than by producing an actual sample garment in the workroom. If the client liked the design, they ordered it and the resulting garment made money for the house. Thus, the tradition of designers sketching out garment designs instead of presenting completed garments on models to customers began as an economy.

Throughout the early 20th century, practically all high fashion originated in Paris, and to a lesser extent London. Fashion magazines from other countries sent editors to the Paris fashion shows. Department stores sent buyers to the Paris shows, where they purchased garments to copy (and openly stole the style lines and trim details of others). Both made-to-measure salons and ready-to-wear departments featured the latest Paris trends, adapted to the stores' assumptions about the lifestyles and pocket books of their targeted customers.


roaring Twenties stockings

During the early twentieth century, changes in production methods, cheap immigrant labor, and other structural changes made ready-made clothing more affordable. By the 1920s, a competitive and increasingly mechanized garment industry offered a wide range of prices, and looser, less fitted styles fit well off the rack. Ready-to-wear blouses, skirts, and dresses became increasingly popular and fewer women sewed. 
It can rightly be said that the 1920s ushered in the era of modern fashion. Women fashion for example, moved from the constricting fashions and into the era of short skirts and pants. Men fashion moved from the overly formal style to the wearing of sport clothes. In fact, even in the formal world, modern suits are still based on those worn in the late 20s.

With two distinct fashions emerging, the first running from 1920-25 and the other style, commonly associated with the roaring Twenties running from 1925-32, 1920s fashion had taken a turning point that would forever define fashion down to our time.

1920s fashion, as now, defined who people were and where they belonged in society. Clothes during that time were under heavy scrutiny and criticism especially from the feminists of the 20s who felt that revealing dress styles was not acceptable. Consider also another aspect of 1920s fashion. Fashion always has a political side at its core.

The 1920s fashion had a political-like revolution. The fact that clothes in the 1920s were readily available to any ‘regular' person was as a result of the Industrial Age automation apparently. Now that machines could make clothes faster and cheaper, this ushered in the ready-to-wear revolution that was never there before.

The 1920s fashion of the elite in Paris, London and New York were producing low-cost attire and making them available even in rural farms and outposts of the Midwest. A ‘high-class' girl and a ‘Midwestern' girl from off the farm could now not be distinguished by their clothes. The political statement that the 1920s fashion made set the world on fire and has continued to influence modern fashion down to our day. This can be seen in the ‘Roaring Twenties' styles that fashion designers have re-invented into their modern creations.

The fact that this age of fashion gave even the regular people ‘style' which was uncommon in an age influenced by the Victorian status quo is one reason why the 1920s fashion is so inspiring. It can thus be said that the 1920s fashion set the bar of classical style that we still live by.

The idea that a woman had a sense of style and individuality had emerged and was reflected in the beauty and elegance of 20s clothing. The Roaring Twenties fashion is everywhere today. If you know what you are looking for, you will likely see the influence of the 1920s fashion the next time the red carpet is rolled and the likes of Nicole Kidman walk past it.

Mens knitted waistcoat 1920


A survey of department stores from 1911 to 1925 showed that until 1920, fabric sales kept pace with ready-made clothing, but after 1920, the ready-made overtook fabric. One businessman surveyed in the Middletown study recalled that in 1890, a fabric sale would clear ten bolts on the first day, whereas a similar sale in 1924 drew many fewer customers.


History is extremely important as without it we literally would not be where we are today. With intelligent scientists working on projects we now take for granted; such as the discovery of electricity and the birth of the light bulb. During the period of 1920 to 1929 there were many events which changed the world that we live in today.

The 1920s were important years as the First World War ended and society was recovering from the devastation brought by the event. Although this happened, there were many advances throughout the world such as the freedom for women to vote in the USA and the first person to swim across the English Channel. Technology advances included the first broadcasted television program and the invention of car radios. For entertainment, Micky Mouse was born and the first Winnie the Pooh books were released by A. A. Milne.

In these years, fashion took a curious turn from the huge effect of the previous catastrophic events. The general fashion was more comfortable throughout the earlier decade in comparison to previous years as the population's priority was the war rather than developing fashion styles. Slimmer suits and looser fitting waistcoats were worn from 1910 and this developed into something else within the 1920s.

An introduction to knitwear for men was fashionable during these times as the suit waistcoat was often replaced with a knitted waistcoat or a jumper. This new revolution of comfort within clothing became highly popular and without that influence we may still be wearing tight fitting, uncomfortable clothing today.

Old long jackets, which used to be seen as casual wear, were merely used for formal wear and the casual wear was substituted for a much shorter suit jacket. Belts were paired with a high-waist jacket and suit jackets were generally buttoned up high; this was inspired by the uniforms worn by the military in the war. Trousers were straight, cuffed and shorter than ever before often showing a man's pair of socks.

By the mid-twenties wider trousers known as ‘Oxford Bags' began appearing within the fashion industry and the normal length suit jacket returned to its previous authority. Double-breasted vests also because a popular stylish trend and were often worn with single-breasted jackets.

Sportswear hit a new high as more and more variety was being produced for men thus changing the style completely. Jumpers and short trousers, commonly named knickers, were the most popular form of attire throughout this age and many designers such as Coco Chanel began advertising a brand new way of dressing.

With the new way of less-formal dress and highly advertised sportswear throughout this age we have the ability to see the influence of this era on our current fashion today. Everything that happens in history effects our way of living in the present and our style is highly-inspired by the apparel throughout this particular decade.

Evening dress 1930s


As with all the female fashion during the 1920s, the evening dress progressed to display more of the body. While the skirts were still full length, the neckline in the speakeasy and the European nightclub became low-cut. Backless dresses also remained popular throughout the twenties. An important part of the evening gown during the twenties was the beading. The long straps of the backless dresses (if not the entire dress) featured beaded chiffon fabrics.

Womens wear In the aftermath of World War I, America entered a prosperous era and, as a result of her role in the war, came out onto the world stage. Social customs and morals were relaxed in the giddy optimism brought on by the end of the war and the booming of the Stock Market. New music and new dances came on the scene. Women got the vote in 1920 and were entering the workforce in record numbers. The nationwide prohibition on alcohol was ignored by many when it suited them. There was a revolution in almost every sphere of human activity, and fashion was no exception.

In menswear there was a growing mood of informality, among the Americans especially, which was mirrored in fashions that emphasized youthfulness and relaxation. In the past, there was a special outfit for every event in the well-dressed gentleman's day, but young men in the Twenties, no longer afraid to show their youthfulness, began to wear the same soft wool suit all day long.

Short suit jackets replaced the old long jackets of the past which were now only worn for formal occasions. Men had a variety of sport clothes available to them, including sweaters and short pants, commonly known as knickers. For evening wear a short tuxedo was more fashionable than the tail-coat, which was now seen as somewhat old-fashioned. The London cut, with its slim lines, loose-fitting sleeves, and padded shoulders, perfected by the English tailor Scholte, was very popular.

1869 Guccio Gucci was born in Florence 1906 Guccio Gucci started a small saddler shop in Florence 1920 Guccio Gucci opened the first Gucci watch shop in Florence 1921 The First Gucci boutique was opened in Florence. Gucci Label was officially founded 1923 The first Gucci boutique in Rome was opened. Gucci started to expand outside Florence 1947 Gucci launched the first handbags collection featuring the bamboo handle and red striped webbing 1953 The first Gucci flagship store in New York was opened on Fifth Avenue Guccio Gucci Died 1960 The iconic GG logo was created with the combination of Guccio Gucci's initials 1965 Gucci opened another store at 699 Fifth Avenue

1966 Gucci presented the Flora silk scarf which is favored by Grace Kelly 1967 Gucci presented Jackie O shoulder bag, made well-known by Jackie Kennedy 1968 Gucci opened stores in Hong Kong and Tokyo, starting expansion on Far East. 1979 Aldo Gucci developed the Gucci Accessories Collection and saved company from the danger of bankruptcy 1983 Rodolfo Gucci died which caused a huge shakeup on the company Paolo Gucci proposed a cheaper version of the brand called 'Gucci Plus' 1984 Domenico De Sole joined Gucci America Inc.

1989 Investcorp acquired 50 percent of Gucci while Maurizio Gucci retains the other half and runs the company Dawn Mello, the former president of Bergdorf Goodman, moves to Milan as creative director 1990 Aldo Gucci died 1990

Tom Ford moved to Milan from New York to join Gucci as the company's women's wear designer. 1993 Maurizio Gucci sold his shares to Investcorp and leaves the company for good. 1994 Tom Ford was appointed as creative director De Sole was appointed as chief operating officer 1995 Gucci went public had its first initial public offering on the AMEX and NYSE Madonna dressed head-to-toe Gucci at the MTV Video Music Awards.

De Sole became chairman of the board and chief executive officer of Gucci Group N.V. 1996 Tom Ford won the CFDA Award for international designer of the year 1997 Gucci acquired a watch licensee, Severin-Montres, and renamed it Gucci Timepieces 1999 Gucci made alliance with to fashion conglomerate Pinault-Printemps-Redoute to fight against an acquisition by fashion conglomerate LVMH Gucci acquired Yves Saint Laurent and Sanofi Beautè and a controlling stake in Sergio Rossi.

Tom Ford became creative director of Yves Saint Laurent ready-to-wear 2000 Gucci acquired 51 percent of Alexander McQueen and Bedat & Co Gucci acquires luxury watch producer Boucheron 2001 Gucci acquired a majority stake in Bottega Veneta, 50 percent of Stella McCartney and all of Balenciaga. Gucci ended three-year litigation with LVMH. Pinault-Printemps-Redoute sold all shares on Gucci as agreement.  Gucci share price reduced to $85.52 per share 2003 Gucci announced it wouldn't renew the contracts of Tom Ford and De sole 2004 Alessandra Facchinetti, Frida Giannini and John Ray were appointed as creative director of Gucci.


1920 fashion model


During the 20s, women began to wear makeup. The main emphasis was the lips. Women wore bold and deep shades of lipstick. Some of the popular shades included red and bright pink. They also wore other types of makeup, but the rest of the face was kept very natural-looking for the most part.

The 1920s fashion that was sported by flappers was looked at by the conservatives as what had gone wrong in the world. Interestingly enough, the styles that were worn during this time period are very similar to the ones that are popular today. The bob hairstyle and nude appearance both are quite popular styles in fashion today.

1920s fashion
Soon after the First World War, a radical change came about in fashion. Bouffant coiffures gave way to short bobs, dresses with long trains gave way to above-the-knee pinafores. Corsets were abandoned and women borrowed their clothes from the male wardrobe and chose to dress like boys. Although, at first, many couturiers were reluctant to adopt the new androgynous style, they embraced them wholeheartedly from around 1925. A bustless, waistless silhouette emerged and aggressive dressing-down was mitigated by feather boas, embroidery, and showy accessories The [flapper] style (known to the French as the 'garçonne' look) became very popular among young women. The [cloche] hat was widely-worn and sportswear became popular with both men and women during the decade, with designers like Jean Patou and Coco Chanel popularizing the sporty and athletic look.


The great couturière Coco Chanel was a major figure in fashion at the time, as much for her magnetic personality as for her chic and progressive designs. Chanel helped popularize the bob hairstyle, the little black dress, and the use of jersey knit for women's clothing and also elevated the status of both costume  and knitwear.

The art deco movement of the 1920's called for simplicity and sophistication at the same time and the previous centuries dresses that were long and flowing and somewhat bulky were in zinc with the desired lifestyle of art deco, at no stage did the movement wish to revert and cover up the women of the day and the need for a dress for social outings was in need and crying out to be designed by one of the eras fashionistas and Coco Chanel was to answer this calling with her famous black dress she called the FORD which she reduced the puffy long sleeves to nothing and then went about bringing the length above the knees for all the ladies of the day to show off their long hidden legs for the world to see.

Her thinking was that simple can be added upon and a simple black dress could be worn just by its self or accessorized to the hilt with jewelry, hats, scarfs, stockings and coat jacket all at the wearers discretion and impulses depending on the social outing.

The simple design of Coco Chanel became known as The Little Black Dress and no women of the day would be caught without one in her closet or traveling suitcase, The black dress changed fashion all over the world and no matter where you were as long as you had a little black dress you were never caught short of an elegant dress for all occasions and situations. This trend has continued for what is close to a century as the famous little black dress constantly makes appearances in Hollywood and the catwalk runways of the modern world.


So all throughout history the black dress is only promoted as a display of evil, death and misfortune until the early twentieth century where a lady by the name of Coco Chanel designs a dress that will change fashion history and the outlook on the colour of black forever in the eyes of not only the fashion world but also the public at large.

Her timing was perfect as the world was in a period of flamboyance and rejoice of self discovery regarding women's place in society and the way they promoted themselves publicly, the roaring twenties as they were known was a time where the world discovered that style and elegance was only an idea away as fashion trends were embraced for nearly everything in life including cars, furniture and fashion garments.

People were living high off the stock market and a new class of society was sweeping the world at large from Paris to New York the world embraced new ideals and fashions as previously sacred social boundaries also began to crumble which allowed for trends such as dancing the Charleston and doing the foxtrot to become the norm and these high times needed a certain sophistication that demonstrated new found freedoms. So in Paris a clever designer threw away all taboos and went about making a dress that would change history right up until today.

The traditional attire for any villain has always been black and when you think about a witch you most likely will imagine her to be dressed in a black dress and a black robe and hat as they fly through the sky on their broom laughing into the dark night. The witch traditional seeks the darker side of the spiritual world and the black clothing represents this and also the fact that it is considered that a flowing black dress allows for the magnetic energies of life and spirits to travel far more easily when required, where as a tight fitting garment would not allow for this to happen. Also back in the earlier centuries the clothing was made to be worn for many years and as a rule a witch would not wish to waste anything so she would happily wear the same black dress for as many decades as possible.

One example of a modern villain would be the film Misery where Annie Wilkes who the main character and villain spends most of the movie in a dark shade of grey that looks black depending on the light and there is a reason for this because the darker shades of clothing coincide with the darker aspects of life all throughout history. You only have to think of a vampire and there is a strong chance you will imagine her to be wearing a black dress as part of her evil costume.

The Gothic movement have long been associated with black clothing and black dresses as their fashion statement of black clothes labelling them as being anti social with the dark clothing bestowed upon them with black make up to confirm this desired social platform of a culture that live for the darkness of night and fashion ideals to confirm this to all on lookers.


Jeanne Lanvin
Jean Patou


Two other prominent French designers of the 1920s were [Jeanne Lanvin] and [Jean Patou]. Jeanne Lanvin, who began her career in fashion as a milliner, made such beautiful outfits for her young daughter Marguerite that people started to ask for copies, and Lanvin was soon making dresses for their mothers. Lanvin's name appears in the fashion yearbook from about 1901 onwards. However, it was in the 1920s that she reached the peak of her popularity and success.

The Lanvin style embraced the look of the time, with its skillful use of complex trimmings, dazzling embroideries, and beaded decorations in light, clear, floral colours that eventually became a Lanvin trademark. By 1925 Lanvin produced many different products, including sportswear, furs, lingerie, men's fashion, and interior designs. Her global approach to fashion foreshadowed the schemes that all the large contemporary fashion houses would later adopt in their efforts to diversify.


In the aftermath of World War I, America entered a prosperous era and, as a result of her role in the war, came out onto the world stage. Social customs and morals were relaxed in the giddy optimism brought on by the end of the war and the booming of the Stock Market. New music and new dances came on the scene. Women got the vote in 1920 and were entering the workforce in record numbers. The nationwide prohibition on alcohol was ignored by many when it suited them. There was a revolution in almost every sphere of human activity, and fashion was no exception.

Clothing changed with womens changing roles in modern society, particularly with the idea of freedom for women. Although society matrons of a certain age continued to wear conservative dresses, forward-looking and younger women now made sportswear into the greatest change in post-war fashion. The tubular dresses of the Teens had evolved into a similar silhouette that now sported shorter skirts with pleats, gathers, or slits to allow motion to rule womens fashion for the first time in history.

The straight-line chemise topped by the close-fitting cloche hat became the uniform of the day. Women "bobbed," or cut, their hair short to fit under the popular hats, a radical move in the beginning, but standard by the end of the decade. Low-waisted dresses with fullness at the hemline allowed women to kick up their heels literally in new dances like the Charleston.


In menswear there were two distinct periods in the 1920s. Throughout the decade, men wore short suit jackets, the old long jackets (on morning suits and tail-coats) being used merely for formal occasions. In the early twenties, men's fashion was characterized by extremely high waisted jackets, often worn with belts. Lapels on suit jackets were not very wide as they tended to be buttoned up high. (This style of jacket seems to have been greatly influenced by the uniforms worn by the military during the First World War.) Trousers were relatively narrow and straight (never tapered) and they were worn rather short so that a men's socks often showed. Trousers also began to be worn cuffed at the bottom at this time.

By 1925, wider trousers commonly known as "Oxford Bags" came into fashion, while suit jackets returned to a normal waist and lapels became wider and were often worn peaked. Loose fitting sleeves (without a taper) also began to be worn during this period. During the late 1920s, double breasted vests, often worn with a single breasted jacket, also became quite fashionable. During the 1920s, men had a variety of sport clothes available to them, including sweaters and short trousers, commonly known as knickers. For formal occasions in the daytime, a morning suit was usually worn. For evening wear men preferred the short tuxedo to the tail-coat, which was now seen as rather old-fashioned and snobbish.


The end of the First World War brought about a general feeling of giddy glee and 1920s fashion reflected the dawning of a new age. Gone were the days when women covered themselves from neck to toes. A new era of prosperity saw women wearing more comfortable clothes than ever before. The flapper influence is making another round of appearances on fashion runways and in women’s closets, so take a cue from 1920s fashion and get ready to update your wardrobe!


Clara Bow


Born: July 29, 1905 in Brooklyn, NY. Clara Bow was on only child. Her father was an alcoholic and her mother was mentally unstable. She was able to escape her sordid life when she entered a 1921 fan magazine contest and won. Her first big break came in 1921 when she landed a supporting role in "Down to the Sea in Ships" (1923). The role required her to masquerade as a boy, and, although it was a drama, it gave her the opportunity to show her talent for comedy, as well.

The movie was a big hit, and Clara went on to appear in four more films before signing with B.P. Schulberg. During 1924 and 1925, she appeared in 21 films, most of them forgettable and many of them on loanout to small independent companies such as Banner, Gotham and Arrow.

One of the best, though, was the Schulberg Produced (for his Preferred Pictures) "The Plastic Age" (1925) about a college flapper who leads an innocent young athlete astray. She received her first real critical notice, though, with "Dancing Mothers" in late 1925. The film starred Alice Joyce, and Bow was her spoiled, jazz-age daughter. Bow's lively spirit and energy on the screen served as an excellent counterpoint to Joyce's cultured demeanour and was perfect for the role.

One of Bow's best roles of her career came in 1926. "Mantrap" co-starred Ernest Torrence and Percy Marmont and cast Bow as a jazz-age city flapper who impetuously marries the backwoods Torrence who takes her back to his remote town of Mantrap.

The very handsome and dignified Marmont comes along, and Bow plots to run away with him. The film had pathos, humour and drama, and, again, Bow was perfect for the role. Infamous British author Elinor Glyn (who shocked Puritanical America with novels such as "Three Week") coined a term called "It" which was supposed to describe someone who had all the qualities, sexual and otherwise, to be appealing to the opposite sex.


bee-stung lips


Cosmetics in the 1920s were characterized by bee-stung lips, kohl-rimmed eyes, and bright cheeks.
The heavily made-up look of the 1920s was a reaction to the demure, feminine Gibson girl of the pre-war period. In the 1920s, an international beauty culture was forged, and society increasingly focused on novelty and change.Fashion trends influenced theatre, films, literature, and art.


Women also found a new need to wear more make-up. A skewed postwar sex ratio created a new emphasis on sexual beauty. Additionally, as women began to enter the professional world, publications such as the French Beauty Industry encouraged women to wear makeup so as to look their best while competing with men for employment.


Lipstick became widely popular after Maurice Levy's 1915 invention of the metal lipstick container. It was available in salve, liquid, and stick forms,and long-lasting, indelible stains were the most popular."Natural" lipgloss was also invented, which used bromo acid to create a red effect as it reacted with the wearer's skin.Finally, flavoured lipstick was also popular, with the most popular variety being cherry.

Back in the 1920's the word "Flapper" was coined to describe to women who danced the latest craze; the Charleston. The term was derived from the movements associated with the dance steps that required that the woman would flap their arms and walk like birds - hence Flappers as in flapping wings of the birds.

Although the dance was popularized during the 1920's, the earliest Charleston is believed to have been part of several Harlem (USA) stage shows being recorded as early as 1913. The coming of the Ragtime jazz era of the 1920's which saw a boom in the popularity of the swinging jazz rhythms which underlie the Charleston cemented the dance into the then popular culture.

This freedom of expression and the freedom of style that went hand in hand with the spread of the dance craze is typical of the social response to the return of the good times following the ending of the First World War. The jazz time era itself was part of this manifestation and the Charleston was a very visible part of this collective feeling of returning well being

Not everyone appreciated this open flaunting of youth and vitality and many saw the Charleston and the Flappers in particular as being evidence of the downfall of moral standards and moral fortitude and directly responsible for many of the moral issues of the day. Certainly the Flappers tended to wear shorter skirts and took to a style of having their hair bobbed but it is true that they also tended towards heavier and more openly visible drinking and smoking habits.


1920s fashion photo


A main goal of flappers was to show off their bodies. Up until this point, it was pretty important for women to wear clothing that covered their legs, necks and arms. With the roaring 20s came a roar of the nude appearance. Skirts that were cut above or just below the knees, which were not worn before, became the popular length. Shirts became much lower cut and sleeveless, showing off the neck and arms. The most common colour that was worn during the 20s was nude, which added to the overall nude appearance.

Two of the most influential fashion designers of the time were Jacques Doucet and Mariano Fortuny. The French designer Jacques Doucet excelled in superimposing pastel colors and his elaborate gossamery dresses suggested the Impressionist shimmers of reflected light. His distinguished customers never lost a taste for his fluid lines and flimsy, diaphanous materials. While obeying imperatives that left little to the imagination of the couturier, Doucet was nonetheless a designer of immense taste and discrimination, a role many have tried since, but rarely with Doucet's level of success.

Changes in dress during World War I were dictated more by necessity than fashion. As more and more women were forced to work, they demanded clothes that were better suited to their new activities. Social events had to be postponed in favor of more pressing engagements and the need to mourn the increasing numbers of dead, visits to the wounded, and the general gravity of the time meant that darker colors became the norm. A new monochrome look emerged that was unfamiliar to young women in comfortable circumstances. By 1915 fashionable skirts had risen above the ankle and then later to mid-calf.

Fair Isle patterns became very popular for both sexes. Heels, at the time, were often over two inches high and Coco Chanel helped popularize the two-tone shoe, one of her trademarks. [Salvatore Ferragamo] and André Perugia were two of the most influential and respected designers in footwear. Many stars of the [silent film]s had a significant impact on fashion during the 1920s, perhaps most notably [Louise Brooks], Gloria Swanson, and [Colleen Moore]. The light hearted, forward-looking fashions of the 1920s gradually came to halt after the [Wall Street Crash of 1929], and succumbed to a more conservative style. 


Flappers dancing 1925


In menswear there was a growing mood of informality, among the Americans especially, which was mirrored in fashions that emphasized youthfulness and relaxation. In the past, there was a special outfit for every event in the well-dressed gentleman's day, but young men in the Twenties, no longer afraid to show their youthfulness, began to wear the same soft wool suit all day long. Short suit jackets replaced the old long jackets of the past which were now only worn for formal occasions.

Men had a variety of sport clothes available to them, including sweaters and short pants, commonly known as knickers. For evening wear a short tuxedo was more fashionable than the tail-coat, which was now seen as somewhat old-fashioned. The London cut, with its slim lines, loose-fitting sleeves, and padded shoulders, perfected by the English tailor Scholte, was very popular.

The American graphic artist, Charles Dana Gibson (1867 - 1944), created one of the first pin-up Gibson Girlgirls with his series of illustrations of "The Gibson Girl". This independent woman became the role model of the 1920's woman and was featured in many an art deco painting.

Even before the World War I, there was a movement afoot in which women were exerting more independence. These strongly independent women were dubbed "flappers" as early as 1912 in a British coinage that came from the comparison of these women with fledgling birds leaving the nest.

1920s Flapper Butterfly magazine cover with the onset of the First World War, women took on roles that had previously been the preserve of men. The euphoria and sense of freedom that came with the end of the war in 1918 provided fertile soil for the new-found independent spirit of women to flourish and resist any demands to return to the kitchen.



Before the war, women had worn elaborate, full length dresses with layers of restrictive undergarments or more formal dress as dress code. In the 1920s, body crippling corsets were abandoned, hemlines rose and rose, and the boyish figure became all the rage. Dress Costume or Frocks as they were called, were low waisted and by 1926 knee length.

They were often embroidered or decorated with beads and tassels. To complement the newly revealed legs, sexy stockings became a daring flesh colour instead of the traditional black. Favourite accessories were dangling earrings and long necklaces. Fashionable colours mentioned in an advertisement for frocks, flapper costumes and suits included "Roseda, Orchid, Bracken, Amethyst and Navy".

The modern young woman, or "sexy flapper" as she was sometimes called with her flapper dress costume or fancy dress was often bold enough to wear powder, rouge and pale blue eye shadow in the evening and may even have plucked her eyebrows.

Some women were beginning to smoke, not only at home but in public, and this shocked many people. Flappers did away with corsets and pantaloons in favour of "step-in" panties. Without the old restrictive corsets, flappers wore simple bust bodices to make their chest hold still when dancing.

They also wore new, softer and suppler corsets that reached to their hips, smoothing the whole frame giving women a straight up and down appearance, as opposed to the old corsets which slenderized the waist and accented the hips and bust.

Without the added curves of a corset they promoted their boyish look. Adding an even more boyish look, the Symington Side Lacer was invented and became a popular essential as an every-day bra for, not only flappers, but women.

This type of bra was made to pull in the back to flatten out the chest. Women envied flappers for their flat chests and bought the Symington Side Lacer to enhance the same look. Hence, flat chests became sexy and appealing for women, although flappers were the most common to wear such bras.


1920s fashion women

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